#1
I play bass in a Weezer cover band with a few of my cousins who normally don't play through amplifiers. I loaned one of my cousins my Music Man Sixty-Five head and a Hartke 120 Watt 4x10 speaker cabinet.

**** was going fine, played two shows with it and it was perfect (except it sound too "metal" for one of my cousins). We go to practice at my brother's house last weekend and my cousin (the "too metal" sounding one) INSISTS on bringing his Music Man HD-130 head to use, and I told him "No, the cabinet cant handle it."

I arrive to the practice late, as usual because of traffic, and to my surprise the head is hooked up to my speaker cabinet. After all is said and done, we get no sound out of my speaker cabinet while either head is hooked up, the 65 watt and the 130 watt.

My question is, did my cousin blow my speaker cabinet? Im pretty sure he did by playing the 130 watt head through an amp rated for 120 watts, but I'm not an electrician nor an amp brain. Makes sense to me at least.

Should I kill him now?
#2
As long as he didn't dime the head then 10 extra watts wont hurt anything... so I'm willing to bet that your cousin is NOT to blame for this.
#3
Quote by i_am_metalhead
As long as he didn't dime the head then 10 extra watts wont hurt anything... so I'm willing to bet that your cousin is NOT to blame for this.


I got mad at practice but kept my cool, so I'm happy that I was right to do so.

Now that that has been handled, I have another question.

My speaker cabinet no longer produces sound when hooked up. I have a multimeter that I can use to test it, but I'm unsure on what setting I should use. Besides this one incident, the speaker cabinet has probably sat for a few months with about 15 hours of use total. Anybody have any clue one what it could be or where I could start looking for a problem?
#4
Did he use a speaker or instrument cable to hook up the cab?

If he used instrument, he probably had to crank it to get usable volume - in turn blowing the speaker. Probably saved the life of the head, and not having the local fire department pay a visit.
Last edited by 667 at Jan 22, 2009,
#5
Quote by 667
Did he use a speaker or instrument cable to hook up the cab?

If he used instrument, he probably had to crank it to get usable volume - in turn blowing the speaker. Probably saved the life of the head, and not having the local fire department pay a visit.


Lucky for me, my dad is anal about one thing and that is labeling our speaker cables. They got a nice big fat bright white "SPEAKER CABLE" label on the plug, so yes, he used a speaker cable, that I am sure of.

Actually, because of my dad being anal, the cabinet has never been played through without a speaker cable with either a blackfaced Fender Bassman or my Music Man Sixty Five head, in case that does anybody any good. I just want it working again.
#7
Quote by GoDrex
Does the cab have a fuse? Some do.


I'm not too sure if it does actually. I'll take a look when I head to my brothers later tonight. This might be helpful to someone to know if it does or not, the cabinet does have a "Stereo/Mono" switch and two input jacks for different ohms.

My guess is that it does, but I'll update you guys when I get a chance after checking it out. Thanks for the suggestion GoDrex!
Last edited by Joe-White at Jan 22, 2009,
#8
for him to blow out a 120watt cab with a 130watt head. he has to put the volume on full blast.
see if you can check the soldering was done correctly.
#9
But, does your cousin know the difference?
#10
Quote by kckyle
for him to blow out a 120watt cab with a 130watt head. he has to put the volume on full blast.
see if you can check the soldering was done correctly.


The soldering inside the cabinet? As in to the switches and stuff? I'll give that a once over too once I'm there. The cabinet hasn't been touched on the inside since the factory, as I only rewire my guitars.

Quote by 667
But, does your cousin know the difference?


No, he doesn't, but my brother does. My amp was correctly set up at my brothers house for when we play and he just switched the head, using the same cable I use. The head he used was set to 4 ohms (as my MM Sixty Five) plugged into the 4 ohm input on the cabinet.
Last edited by Joe-White at Jan 22, 2009,
#11
The next Question is "Was his amps impedence the correct match for the cabinet? A mis-match can blow speakers and amps. Usually the amp goes first.
#12
Quote by barefootboy
The next Question is "Was his amps impedence the correct match for the cabinet? A mis-match can blow speakers and amps. Usually the amp goes first.


He already said "the 4 ohm out of the amp was plugged into the 4 ohm input on the cab"
#13
Quote by i_am_metalhead
He already said "the 4 ohm out of the amp was plugged into the 4 ohm input on the cab"


Not if the stereo/mono switch was in the wrong postion.
#14
Quote by barefootboy
Not if the stereo/mono switch was in the wrong postion.


That completely slipped my mind - you have a very valid point. However when impedance is mismatched, normally the amp will blow before the speakers do.
#15
Quote by kckyle
for him to blow out a 120watt cab with a 130watt head. he has to put the volume on full blast.

that's assuming the 130 watt rating is the peak output rather than RMS.

ask him what sounds, if any, it made when he turned it on.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#16
If the cabinet was turned to stereo, and was only plugged into one side, it'd be running it at 65W (half of the total wattage), in which case he might have blown 2 speakers, but not the other two. It's possible to mix match ohms on a head without blowing the amp, some amps are more tolerable than others.

But, if it wasn't turned to stereo, I kind of doubt the speakers are blown.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#17
Quote by barefootboy
Not if the stereo/mono switch was in the wrong postion.


The cabinet is set to 8 ohms when the switch is to Stereo.

Quote by Lemoninfluence
that's assuming the 130 watt rating is the peak output rather than RMS.

ask him what sounds, if any, it made when he turned it on.


My dad has a HD-130 head as well, so this is off the back of his amp, not my cousins, and it says Output: 130 Watts RMS. So I guess that it is?

Also, my cousin is playing stupid so he won't have any blame shifted on him. Called and asked and he said "I don't remember. It sounded fine to me then it went out."

Quote by MatrixClaw
If the cabinet was turned to stereo, and was only plugged into one side, it'd be running it at 65W (half of the total wattage), in which case he might have blown 2 speakers, but not the other two. It's possible to mix match ohms on a head without blowing the amp, some amps are more tolerable than others.

But, if it wasn't turned to stereo, I kind of doubt the speakers are blown.


The cabinet runs in stereo, but the head isn't. This still seems plausible (to me at least). The cabinet would be rated for 60 watts when switched to stereo (65 would be the head) and the difference between 60 and 130 is pretty big.

My question is, that with only two speakers blown out, would the entire cab fail to function when set to mono? This is hypothetical right now, but it makes sense to me.
#18
Quote by Joe-White
My dad has a HD-130 head as well, so this is off the back of his amp, not my cousins, and it says Output: 130 Watts RMS. So I guess that it is?

Also, my cousin is playing stupid so he won't have any blame shifted on him. Called and asked and he said "I don't remember. It sounded fine to me then it went out."

the 130 watts RMS is almost like an average output reading rather than the peak output.

an amp rated at 50 watts RMS can easily put out 70-90 watts, if not more.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#19
I'm guessing it's probably just a connection that's been knocked loose either moving the cabinet around or playing through it. Mismatched impedances and instrument cables won't do anything to the cabinet. A 4 ohm speaker cab will run at it's own impedance, regardless of what the amp is set at (that's why it's so hard on the amp if you use too low of an impedance). And if he actually blew the speakers, it would be hard for him not to realize it.

edit:
Since you have access to a multimeter, switch it to resistance (the omega symbol), and make sure that it checks at roughly the right impedance on each stereo side and the mono input. You can plug a speaker or instrument cable into the cab and check it at the other of the cable.
Last edited by Stickymongoose at Jan 22, 2009,
#20
measure the impedance of the cabinet. See if you're getting an open reading or not.
#21
Quote by Stickymongoose
I'm guessing it's probably just a connection that's been knocked loose either moving the cabinet around or playing through it. Mismatched impedances and instrument cables won't do anything to the cabinet. A 4 ohm speaker cab will run at it's own impedance, regardless of what the amp is set at (that's why it's so hard on the amp if you use too low of an impedance). And if he actually blew the speakers, it would be hard for him not to realize it.

edit:
Since you have access to a multimeter, switch it to resistance (the omega symbol), and make sure that it checks at roughly the right impedance on each stereo side and the mono input. You can plug a speaker or instrument cable into the cab and check it at the other of the cable.


Thanks! I'll do this when I head up there in a little bit.

Also, thank you to the rest of you guys, you've all been seriously helpful. I appreciate the input of everyone.