#1
Aaargh, all my improvisations sound like an over the top bluesy dramatic/sad melody.
It's pretty nice sometimes but after some time it will most likely sound like Dave Mustaine whining about that he got kicked out of Metallica (in other words: people might think, ok and what;s your point now..)
Does anybody know what to do to bring a little variety in my solo's?
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#5
One trick I like to use, which adds a little "floaty jazzy" sound to my solos is to play diatonic thirds starting on the note that is considered the relative major. For example, if its in E minor, I'd start on G, and play the following -

G - B - D - F# - A - C - E - G

It throws a bit of a curve ball into the whole "sad, dramatic" thing. Just resolve back to an E eventually.
#7
Quote by Axe720
One trick I like to use, which adds a little "floaty jazzy" sound to my solos is to play diatonic thirds starting on the note that is considered the relative major. For example, if its in E minor, I'd start on G, and play the following -

G - B - D - F# - A - C - E - G

It throws a bit of a curve ball into the whole "sad, dramatic" thing. Just resolve back to an E eventually.

^ That's cool, I do this quite a lot, descending too, and at the end of a song or improv.

Quote by bgc
Note: This is not using the G major scale; you're still in E minor.
He never actually said he was "in" or "using" the G major scale.

Hence the red.
Last edited by mdc at Jan 23, 2009,
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Note: This is not using the G major scale; you're still in E minor.


As said above, I never said I was using a G major scale, just starting on the third of the E natural minor scale and playing diatonic thirds.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Note: This is not using the G major scale; you're still in E minor.


We would all prefer that you carefully read the entire comment before replying.

anyways...

as a user said above, you don't have to always start the solo with the same note as the root of the cord being played. Mix it up and vary your rhythms a bit.

And if your solos sound bluesy then maybe it's time that you use other scales and phrasings.
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
Last edited by allislost at Jan 23, 2009,
#10
I know it's in Em. I know that he meant for it to be in Em. Did I ever say that the post was somehow incorrect? I simply stated a fact about the concept presented in the post that was not initially included.