#1
Hey all, I was hoping you could help me out.

My Alvarez has been having some problems lately. I'm not an equipment wizard, so I'm not sure what to do. My low E string has been ****ing up big time. I get very little fret buzz on the first couple of frets, but when I get to the 4th fret, it gets significantly worse. The 5th fret is all buzz - I can't even get a note. It just sounds...dead. The 6th fret is bad too, but after that the buzz is gone.

The guitar is vintage and around 35 years old, so I really don't want to **** with it unless I have to. Besides this problem, it's in wonderful condition and plays like a dream.

Any idea what is wrong/what I can do to fix it?
"Let's not be too rough on our own ignorance. I mean, after all, it's the thing that makes America great." - Frank Zappa while on the Arsenio Hall Show

Quote by vintage x metal
On a side note, TS, love the username. I'd kill to be under you.
#2
If you know how, assess the neck relief first! If it's acceptable (straight to some minor relief) then check the string height. If that seems OK, look for a fret that's lifted up at or just below the 6th fret or so. Let us know what you see/find.
Moving on.....
#3
your truss rod may need adjusted. you should take it to an experienced guitar tech. they generally charge around 50 dollars an hour bench time, and it shouldnt take him long to figure out what is going wrong with it.
#4
Its winter dude. Check your humidity levels. My guess is your guitar is dry dry dry and the top is shrinking. Don't touch your truss rod. Please. Misery will only follow if you do, especially if your guitar is dry, you don't want to stress the wood any more than you have to.
********May Truth and Good Music Prevail!********
#5
Quote by KSUGuy
Its winter dude. Check your humidity levels. My guess is your guitar is dry dry dry and the top is shrinking. Don't touch your truss rod. Please. Misery will only follow if you do, especially if your guitar is dry, you don't want to stress the wood any more than you have to.


Hmmm. This could be it. The guitar has been subject to quick temperature changes lately. I keep it in my room about 10 feet from a window, which is more than occasionally open for an extended period of time thanks to a smoking habit. The difference in temperature is about 10 or 15 degrees, as I also have fans blowing behind the guitar to keep ventilate the room.

It would also explain a similar problem I had with the high E string a few days ago. After a while, it sort of fixed itself.

Regardless, I think I'm going to have to bring it to a tech guy to figure it out, because I don't want to risk ****ing it up by tinkering around with it myself.
"Let's not be too rough on our own ignorance. I mean, after all, it's the thing that makes America great." - Frank Zappa while on the Arsenio Hall Show

Quote by vintage x metal
On a side note, TS, love the username. I'd kill to be under you.
Last edited by Thebridge at Jan 23, 2009,
#6
Yep. Just take it to a tech, and tell him exactly what you just told us about the temperature changes. Worst case scenario, you'll need a neck replacement because you've destroyed the neck. Best case (and most likely scenario) is that he'll just tinker with the truss rod and get your vintage acoustic singing again.

You really shouldn't subject a guitar to drastic temperature changes like that. If at all possible, at least keep it away from the window. And make sure it's properly humidified as well.
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