#1
I want to get a loop pedal so that I can leave a backing track on and play lead over it; to develop my lead further, and possibly gig some local venues on my own for a bit of cash. (Band money is all going towards a PA atm )

The Boss RC2 seems pretty good, and I've played around with it, liked it a lot.

But. It's kinda expensive, are there any other companies that make a similar product that's priced lower? I'm keeping an eye on pawn stores, but no dice so far.

Cheers guys.
#5
Quote by Mazzakazza
That doesn't look too bad, why do you find it superior to Boss?

It sounds better, it's cheaper?
Only negative I can find is that it's ugly as hell.
#7
Do you absolutely need it in front of your amp? If you don't need backing tracks for live performance and just something for practice, look into cheap or free software based recording sequencers.

Check out Audacity. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Also, look into a proper audio interface for your computer (if your amp and/or your computer doesn't have a line-in).
#8
Quote by 667
Do you absolutely need it in front of your amp? If you don't need backing tracks for live performance and just something for practice, look into cheap or free software based recording sequencers.

Check out Audacity. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Also, look into a proper audio interface for your computer (if your amp and/or your computer doesn't have a line-in).

That's so much more complex than a pedal-based system....


+1 to the headrush, but with the RC-2, you have more looping time (16 total minutes). The Headrush is also a delay pedal, and the looping functions, while superb, are not as extensive as they could be as a result.
I'm putting my GAS on hold
for a couple months in order to pimp my ride.


Don't judge me.
#9
Quote by theoreticmusic
That's so much more complex than a pedal-based system....



Not "so much" more complex...I thought so too at first.

It's about $5 for 1/8" adapter to get the signal from your guitar to the computer - and the software is free.

Yea, there is a little learning curve - but it's actually easier than most people think. I know you just want to play and not have to learn another thing (because it takes away from playing). But it's cool to learn because you are learning RECORDING which you'll probably eventually get into if you stick with all this stuff.

I have a Jamman on my pedal board btw.. I started with that. If you are figuring looper stuff out, you can handle it.
#10
Quote by 667
Not "so much" more complex...I thought so too at first.

It's about $5 for 1/8" adapter to get the signal from your guitar to the computer - and the software is free.

Yea, there is a little learning curve - but it's actually easier than most people think. I know you just want to play and not have to learn another thing (because it takes away from playing). But it's cool to learn because you are learning RECORDING which you'll probably eventually get into if you stick with all this stuff.

I have a Jamman on my pedal board btw.. I started with that. If you are figuring looper stuff out, you can handle it.

No...it's more complex on a practical scale, not a learning scale. I do it too with recording, but it's not useful in a live situation, and a looper pedal is more useful first. I think comp. looping is something to do after the looping pedal.

Oh, and a computer sound card is not designed to have a guitar run straight into it.
I'm putting my GAS on hold
for a couple months in order to pimp my ride.


Don't judge me.
#11
Quote by theoreticmusic
No...it's more complex on a practical scale, not a learning scale. I do it too with recording, but it's not useful in a live situation, and a looper pedal is more useful first. I think comp. looping is something to do after the looping pedal.

Oh, and a computer sound card is not designed to have a guitar run straight into it.


I hear you.

My understanding was that the OP wanted something for practice, I was just offering and cheap alternative solution. But ya, for live, not-so-much.

But the knowledge is useful. Being able to dump sequenced tracks from the computer to the looper does have potential for performance situations.

I'm working on using an Akai MPD24 to trigger events (drums, backing tracks, tempo changes) to my looper on the fly. The Jamman has 99 save spots, and with the external foot-switch, I can scroll and trigger it pretty seamlessly.

...and with my Boss OC-3, I'm working getting on the fly bass-lines in there too.