#1
alright..
in the same measure you have a double sharp
then you have to change that back to just a sharp..
what accidental would you use to do so??

a flat? cuz you would have to flaten the double sharp??
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#2
just don't use double sharps, they're not needed, 2 sharps is the next note up usually...
#3
that does seem kinda redundant, but yea, a flat sounds good
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#4
You would denote it with a sharp. You always go by what the note is becoming, without regard to where it has come from. For instance a double sharp followed by a natural would still be denoted by a natural, not two naturals are anything like that.
#5
Quote by JesterShred
just don't use double sharps, they're not needed, 2 sharps is the next note up usually...


You most certainly use double sharps in a number of circumstances. What other accidental would you use for the leading tone in A# minor?
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#6
Double sharps are at times necessary and appear rather frequently. You would simply write a sharp sign after a double because accidentals are always in reference to the key signature.
#7
i have to write out scales
and melodic and harmonic minor scales sometimes do call for double sharp

i was wondering cuz in d# melodic minor ascending the leading tone is Cx (C##)
and descending the note would have to be C#

right?
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#9
Quote by victoryaloy
i was wondering cuz in d# melodic minor ascending the leading tone is Cx (C##) and descending the note would have to be C#
Classical theory calls for the 7th of the melodic minor to be natural ascending and flattened descending, but in modern music, it is usually natural ascending and descending.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Classical theory calls for the 7th of the melodic minor to be natural ascending and flattened descending, but in modern music, it is usually natural ascending and descending.


yeah.. its for classical theory.

so i'm good?
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#11
If there is no key signature, and keeping in mind that all accidentals last to the end of the bar, a double sharp can be changed back to a single sharp by simply writing a single sharp back in front of that note. Remember, you aren't flattening the note, you're lowering it by a half-step. There is a difference.

If there is a key signature, say D major, and you want to bring F## back to F#, you would write a natural, a sharp, THEN the F. Because if I write a natural beside F, the person reading the music assumes that natural lowers the note a half step from the key signature, so they'd play F natural.

Keep in mind different theorists do it differently, but that way is the most practical.
#12
Quote by Axe720
If there is no key signature, and keeping in mind that all accidentals last to the end of the bar, a double sharp can be changed back to a single sharp by simply writing a single sharp back in front of that note. Remember, you aren't flattening the note, you're lowering it by a half-step. There is a difference.



but ones it is already doubled sharped would you have to flatten it to get it to just being sharp??

cuz wouldn't putting another sharp raise it again.
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#13
Quote by victoryaloy
but ones it is already doubled sharped would you have to flatten it to get it to just being sharp??

cuz wouldn't putting another sharp raise it again.


Nope. Think of it this way. Say you have a key signature of D. And you have used an accidental to raise your F# to an F##. Now if I write another F note, and put a flat next to it, it becomes F natural. Remember, you ALWAYS revert back to the key signature. So putting a flat with the F, according to the key signature, would mean lowering the F# to an F natural, and thats not what you want. So to change F## back to F#, you'd simply put a natural and a sharp. The natural tells you that even though the F is sharp according to the key signature, you lower it a half step. Then the sharp after that tells you to raise it back to F#, thus resetting things, so to speak.

Complicated, yes a bit, but it is easy once you get it down. Hope this helps.
#14
thanks!!

makes sense
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#16
No its relative to the key signature (KS) bud. if its sharped in your KS it makes it a double sharp if theres a sharp in the bar. ex, if youre playing in G Major (F#), and your bar has an F# you play F##

If theres no sharp in the KS (previous example but in C Major) and you wanna double sharp it just write F##

Now if you wanna go from F## to F# (relatively speaking) in G Major youd write bF (F Nat)
but if its in C Maj youd just put F#

EX

Imagine both examples are a single bar with 2 half notes, first being F## second F# (or equivalent)

GMaj = F#, F
CMaj = F##, F#

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Last edited by Camdon at Jan 22, 2009,