#1
Today is a NGD!

Anyway i just obtained myself a new Ibanez RG7321, not my fanciest nor even my fanciest 7, but nice to have as a second nonetheless.

Anyway ive only had it 12 hours and im already thinking of doing some butchery on the thing, (pickups, electronics, locking tuners, maybe even a MIDI rectrofit)

But ive just pondered about whether i could scallop the upper frets on the board

Im talking about probably the last 4, so 21 to 24

Is this feasible to do, and what tools would i need?
Also tips and things to look out for if any

Cheers
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#4
Firstly it's not as easy as it look's, you have to be very carefull to make a butchery of it.

Go slowly and doing one fret at a time and set your self a depth before you start

You could use files and sand paper.

However fine files take a very very long time to get through the wood, You could try using a coarse file then a fine file to neaten it up and then go over the fretboard with 240 grit and then something like 1500, make sure you masking tape your frets before hand
Black Knight CF-60F Semi-Acoustic.

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#5
good link, just wondering about the inlays, I have shark fin on mine...will it be ok?
#6
dont scallop too deep or u can mess up the fret board and make it thin.if so the rod is the only thing that is going to keep ur neak from breaking
#7
Quote by metalwarrior40

yep, use that

but dont even bother if you're only doing those last couple of frets, because the frets are so close together you've got no chance of pressing the string down so hard that your fingers touch the fretboard anyway. ie, scalloping would have zero effect
#8
Quote by Diamond Dave
yep, use that

but dont even bother if you're only doing those last couple of frets, because the frets are so close together you've got no chance of pressing the string down so hard that your fingers touch the fretboard anyway. ie, scalloping would have zero effect



In my humble opinion ( though it is formed on a good deal of experience with scalloped boards ), scalloping ALWAYS has an effects, as even on the highest of frets, you will hit the wood with your finger tip on bends and while playing anything wider than the shallowest of vibratos. Considering bends and vibrato are pretty much the main things going on past fret 20 or so, scalloping would make a significant difference here.


To the TS: go to the Project Guitar tutorial people are linking here and do it like it shows. Scalloping frets from about 18 and higher is mind bogglingly simple, easy, and takes relatively little time. Just make sure to get a decent round rasp/file, and you'll tear through the top 4-6 frets in about 40 minutes on your first try. I've scalloped a number of boards, and can now scallop the top 6-7 frets with a round rasp in under 15 minutes, just to give you an idea of how easy it is with a little practice.


Just go slow, and have fun!

EDIT: and for goodness sakes use the search bar. I swear it feels like I'm on here 4 times a week defending scalloped finger boards
Last edited by lumberjack at Jan 22, 2009,
#9
Quote by lumberjack
In my humble opinion ( though it is formed on a good deal of experience with scalloped boards ), scalloping ALWAYS has an effects, as even on the highest of frets, you will hit the wood with your finger tip on bends and while playing anything wider than the shallowest of vibratos. Considering bends and vibrato are pretty much the main things going on past fret 20 or so, scalloping would make a significant difference here.


To the TS: go to the Project Guitar tutorial people are linking here and do it like it shows. Scalloping frets from about 18 and higher is mind bogglingly simple, easy, and takes relatively little time. Just make sure to get a decent round rasp/file, and you'll tear through the top 4-6 frets in about 40 minutes on your first try. I've scalloped a number of boards, and can now scallop the top 6-7 frets with a round rasp in under 15 minutes, just to give you an idea of how easy it is with a little practice.


Just go slow, and have fun!

EDIT: and for goodness sakes use the search bar. I swear it feels like I'm on here 4 times a week defending scalloped finger boards

i just went and grabbed my guitar which isnt scalloped and realized you're right i am touching the fretboard up there. I still think its not worth going to the trouble of scalloping anything unless you continue down to around the 12th fret at least, or preferably do the whole board. Scalloping is awesome, not quite a "must-have" but close.