#1
so we all have a pretty good idea about how different genres sound, but if you where to describe a genre by using only music theory, how would you do it. you can try to explain any genre you please.

(this is not for my benefit, more my curiousity.)
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Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
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along with fire escape routes...

#2
hmm, thats kinda tricky.... Well obviously Blues uses the Blue scale, 7th chords, etc
Progressive is for changing of timings and keys during the songs
Metal uses alot of quick 5th chords in the harmonic minor keys, fast beats on drums, such as 32 notes.
erm.... damn this is hard haha, those are the only ones i can think of
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#3
thats the idea.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#4
Deathcore uses: Dissonant chords, drop tuned "chugging", tremelo picking, blast beats, deep growled vocals, high pitched shrieks or pig squeals, breakdowns, ect.
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#5
Genres seem to be defined in some sort of crude genealogical terms rather than anything specific to the music. For instance the different styles of blues are grouped together because they share the same heritage. Often this does mean they share musical ideas, but not always. You listen to something like Blind Blake and then B.B. King and there is nothing obvious connecting them, but they are still both blues. If you try to catagorise a genre in terms of specific musical ideas you'll end up calling things different which, for historical reasons, are considered the same.

The blues scale is common in the likes of T-Bone Walker or Buddy Guy, but not in Son House or Robert Johnson. I don't think you can really put your finger on a single musical trait that is shared across the genre.
#6
Quote by anotherbluesguy
Genres seem to be defined in some sort of crude genealogical terms rather than anything specific to the music. For instance the different styles of blues are grouped together because they share the same heritage. Often this does mean they share musical ideas, but not always. You listen to something like Blind Blake and then B.B. King and there is nothing obvious connecting them, but they are still both blues. If you try to catagorise a genre in terms of specific musical ideas you'll end up calling things different which, for historical reasons, are considered the same.

The blues scale is common in the likes of T-Bone Walker or Buddy Guy, but not in Son House or Robert Johnson. I don't think you can really put your finger on a single musical trait that is shared across the genre.


yes but in this instance, i suppose it is the different subgenres within that genre. for example, in basic metalcore is is mostly 4/4 time, whereas in mathcore there are time signatures that are extremely uncommon.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#7
There are imo 2 "Styles" of Genre's;

1 is based on musical decisions (think using harmonic minor in classical music)
&
1 is based on a mind set (think rock = sex, drugs & rock n roll and energetic)

I will explain below

Alot of Jimi Hendrix songs can be seen as pop songs.

If 'fire' or 'crosstown traffic' came out today with modern production it would almost certain be seen as a pop song.

Alot of genre's have trait, but there are only a few distinct genre based purely on musical traits.

Classical
music for once is a "true" genre. Bebop Jazz is a "true" genre and Blues is almost a "true" genre (blues has changed over the years of how people view it)

While Rock and pop don't solely rely on musical traits but on human traits. (it's more the mind set that makes something rock n roll, then any particular scale or musical trait)

Pop is just popular music for the time and doesn't have ANY distinct musical trait. You have pop songs with middle eastern influences, pop songs using electronic influences pop songs with electric guitars etc. etc.

Progressive rock
is a mind set as well relying on implying music that "thinks" further then a standard composition.

Electronic music is a "true" genre, cause it requires THE elements of music reproduced on an electronic instrument rather then an acoustic based instrument. An electric guitar is special here cause it's a bit in between. (which is probably the reason why Guitar is used in electronic music as well (think daft punk)

Metal
is not a "True" musical Genre (anymore). Metal is defined by heavy guitar riffs and this is not a musical trait, but a sound trait.

You get the point lol; genre is a misleading word, and in my opinion the above explained things are what I divide it in.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 23, 2009,
#8
Hard Rock uses generic 4/4 beats, rare time signature changes, occasional arpeggios, singers who can hit high notes, pentatonics/minor scale for solos.