#1
Hi, I need a new multi effects medal, for a decent price (around £100-150) with a good quality, and I came accross the RP350, which looks as if it does what I want it. I usually play my guitar through either my amp (Marshall MG30 - which sounds crap without an effects pedal), or headphones (I have to keep the noise down often). So I'm wondering if any of you have this pedal and what do you think of it, and if anyone can suggest a good multi-effects pedal for my price range. (By the way I have a Shecter Black Hawk, and play hard rock/metal) and any suggestions of amps with built in effects will be welcome too Thanks
#2
You don't plug effects pedals into modeling amps...especially not MFX pedals. It will sound bad. Your best bet is to get something like the RP and just play it through headphones.

I like the line 6 floor pod more than the RP...http://www.thomann.de/gb/line6_floor_pod.htm
I'm putting my GAS on hold
for a couple months in order to pimp my ride.


Don't judge me.
#3
I am a huge fan of the Digitech RP series of pedals. I currently own 2 of the RP200 and 1 of the RP350 pedals. I recently bought the RP350 pedal mainly for recording because it has a USB inteface that let's you plug it directly into your computer. I then use Acid to record. The sound quality is excellent. Absolutely NO NOISE when recording. I simply dial in the effect that I want and voila it records that exact sound.

When using the RP pedals I play through a clean channel on my amp so the effects of the pedal are doing all the work. You don't want to play through an overdrive, distorted, or amplifier effects in addition to the pedal effects.

Don't hesitate in buying the pedal. You will LOVE it! If you go to musiciansfriend.com and look up the pedal there are several .mp3 files with some of the different settings you can dial in. Or, go to Digitech's website and you can do the same.

Oh yeah, the other thing I meant to mention was the Xedit software that comes with the RP350. It basically brings up a GUI interface of the pedal so you can change cabinets, amp heads, effects, etc. right on screen, then save those settings to one of the open slots in the pedal. Awesome!
#4
Do you have any suggestions for good quality headphones to use with an effects pedal?
#7
I have an RP350 and like it a lot, but it's a complicated piece of hardware. If you're looking for simplicity you won't find it here. To take full advantage of it you'll need to hook it up to a PC or laptop and use the X-Edit software that can be downloaded from the Digitech website. There are 70 preconfigured tones on it, and some of them sound pretty good. Also there is a tool that lets you choose tones from a library to create your own. But none of them were exactly what I was looking for so I've created my own patches.

Here's my signal path:

compressor pedal -> overdrive pedal -> distortion pedal -> amp input/preamp -> RP350 in effects loop -> amp output

I have my amp all set to "5" on the EQ on both channels, with channel 1 a clean and channel 2 a light overdrive. I can switch between the channels with a footswitch. Then I can use the overdrive pedal or the distortion pedal for heavier overdrive or distortion on channel 1. My amp is not a modeling amp, but if I had a modeling amp I would turn off all modeling to use the RP350 with it.

I'm mainly using the RP350 as a volume pedal, EQ, floor tuner, and noise gate. I have some of my patches boosted with the modeled TS-808 as a clean boost. All the stompboxes modeled in the RP have the same controls as the real thing. And I'm using analog delay on some of the patches for rhythm and lead stuff, some of the Lexicon reverbs, etc. I'm not using any amp modeling at all and am using the preamp tone of my own amp. I am using the "Vintage" speaker cabinet modeling on some of the patches which models Celestion Vintage 30s. You can get just about any tone you want out of the RP350, but it might take some time fooling with it and working with it to pull out the tones. It's cool for someone who likes to mess with their gear and experiment and try stuff. If you "just want to play" and want simplicity the RP350 will be frustrating. If you want wah I would get a discrete wah pedal, the built in wahs are not very good in the RP350. The RP350 has a looper and a bunch of useful connections on the back which is nice. btw Digitech just came out with the RP355 which is similar to the 350 but with a few more features.

Another option would be a Peavey Vyper 30 amp.
#8
Quote by hunter33
I have an RP350 and like it a lot, but it's a complicated piece of hardware. If you're looking for simplicity you won't find it here. To take full advantage of it you'll need to hook it up to a PC or laptop and use the X-Edit software that can be downloaded from the Digitech website. There are 70 preconfigured tones on it, and some of them sound pretty good. Also there is a tool that lets you choose tones from a library to create your own. But none of them were exactly what I was looking for so I've created my own patches.

Here's my signal path:

compressor pedal -> overdrive pedal -> distortion pedal -> amp input/preamp -> RP350 in effects loop -> amp output

I have my amp all set to "5" on the EQ on both channels, with channel 1 a clean and channel 2 a light overdrive. I can switch between the channels with a footswitch. Then I can use the overdrive pedal or the distortion pedal for heavier overdrive or distortion on channel 1. My amp is not a modeling amp, but if I had a modeling amp I would turn off all modeling to use the RP350 with it.

I'm mainly using the RP350 as a volume pedal, EQ, floor tuner, and noise gate. I have some of my patches boosted with the modeled TS-808 as a clean boost. All the stompboxes modeled in the RP have the same controls as the real thing. And I'm using analog delay on some of the patches for rhythm and lead stuff, some of the Lexicon reverbs, etc. I'm not using any amp modeling at all and am using the preamp tone of my own amp. I am using the "Vintage" speaker cabinet modeling on some of the patches which models Celestion Vintage 30s. You can get just about any tone you want out of the RP350, but it might take some time fooling with it and working with it to pull out the tones. It's cool for someone who likes to mess with their gear and experiment and try stuff. If you "just want to play" and want simplicity the RP350 will be frustrating. If you want wah I would get a discrete wah pedal, the built in wahs are not very good in the RP350. The RP350 has a looper and a bunch of useful connections on the back which is nice. btw Digitech just came out with the RP355 which is similar to the 350 but with a few more features.

Another option would be a Peavey Vyper 30 amp.



I would have to agree on the Wah and a few other effects on the RP350. If you want a good Wah effect then I would use an additional pedal. I have a Dunlop Cry Baby that I use just for Wah effect.

I'm not sure I agree with the difficulty in using the RP350. It may take some time to get the settings you want for a particular sound, but once you get it dialed in and saved, then it's done. As with most pedals and effects, I like exploring them to see what's good and bad about them. That's the fun in getting a new pedal.
#9
For a little bit more you could get the RP500. I got mine for $240 usd. It's got 5 stompswitches to use as either pedalboard fx chains, or programmable presets. It has all of the same features plus more.

Compare features side by side and see whatcha think. I love mine, plus it is totally tailored toward live gigging and durability (unlike most other RP series pedals).