#1
This might belong in the GB&C, not sure though.

I basically want to know what parts of an amp (like the Framus Cobra) give the distortion sound that "3D" characteristic. I've heard it used for a few different pieces of equipment (Like the Rocktron Zombie distortion, and the Mullard 12AT7 preamp tube), but I don't really know what part of the amp/pedal/tube construction creates that.

Anyone with the knowledge or insight to answer this question?
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
Last edited by Shinozoku at Jan 23, 2009,
#2
If I understand what you're talking about, I'd say the key to a more "3D" sound is multiple speakers. If you compare a 1x12" cab to a 4x12" cab, the actual sound produced won't be much different but the 4x12" will give a fuller feel if that makes sense.

Good quality speakers will help too. The one thing almost everyone seems to overlook is the impact your speakers will have on your overal tone.
#3
Speakers have a HUGE impact on tone. I really don't know why people misunderstand that. It's the same principle concerning speakers on your computer when you're listening to music; they play a large role in it's tone.

Tubes help create that particular sound of a dimensional quality, as well. It's method to that, I imagine, is by how responsive and gritty they are. It picks up all the little nuances of the playing and duplicates the guitars irregularity almost perfectly, you see. Thus creating a more overall sound - covering all aspects of the guitar and amps tone.
While Solid State/Digital amps have specific tone frequencies and sticks to that.

The room itself makes an impact, as well: Whether it's padded; whether it has hollow walls; where the amplifier is placed; where you are sit in conjunction with the speaker; how high off the ground it is; what kind of speaker it is.

In all, there are many different avenues that help define that '3D' sound. Your ears do most of the work, though.
#4
Oh, and BTW, the Framus amps are just bloody brilliant, as well. I'm getting the Dragon Head soon enough.
#6
Harmonic complexity gives an amp a 3-d tone. It's really that quality that separates good tube amps from bad tube amps.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 23, 2009,
#7
chorus, just a tad
-Gear-
Line 6 Flextone III Plus
Behringer FCB1010 Emulating a FBV Longboard
#8
i think you mean reverb, you can get it in pedal form
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#9
no i meant chorus, i just assumed he already had reverb as it's pretty standard to have
-Gear-
Line 6 Flextone III Plus
Behringer FCB1010 Emulating a FBV Longboard
#10
Quote by aradroxar
no i meant chorus, i just assumed he already had reverb as it's pretty standard to have


i was referring to TS
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#11
Quote by stevo_epi_SG_wo
i was referring to TS

heheh i see, i still agree though
-Gear-
Line 6 Flextone III Plus
Behringer FCB1010 Emulating a FBV Longboard
#12
Quote by stevo_epi_SG_wo
i think you mean reverb, you can get it in pedal form

I know that But that's not what I'm talking about. I think there was one post that really helped that mentioned harmonic complexity. But how would one achieve said harmonic complexity when modifying say, a Randall MTS preamp module or a distortion box?

And no, I don't own any effects but a Dunlop Wah and an MXR Bass DI
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores