#1
Just wondering, what's the best guitar I could get for under $700USD that'll be great with Classical music? I'm getting an Ibanez RG1550M in PPN in March, but a friend of mine says Basswood and a maple/maple neck combo doesn't work too well with Classical stuff because it sounds too thin (Is this true?). Yngwie uses an Alder body with a maple/maple neck, but Paul Gilbert uses a PGM700 in his classical video (look it up on youtube), which has a mahogany body with a maple/rosewood neck.


tl;dr: What guitar should I get for classical? It'll be played with Paul Gilbert level distortion, to none depending on the piece.

If anyone says classical guitar, then they deserve to accidently a whole herman li
Quote by satchgear
I tried it out in store.

Great neck, nice n light, good tuning stability. Overall a good guitar. I didn't but it cause I generally only buy guitars over a grand now.
#2
Electric Guitars are not generally used for classical music, but there are some things you can try looking at. First off, whatever guitar you get will need to give an appropriate “classical” tone, which really depends on how YOU want it to sound.

I would recommend going to your local music store, and just start playing some classical music on various guitars: one of them should stand out to you as having “that sound.”

Quote by V.U.K
If anyone says classical guitar, then they deserve to accidently a whole herman li


What?
#3
i believe a maple fretboard accounts for no more than .1% of the tone of an instrument. you'd probably want something with a thin, wide neck for the sake of playability. as for sound, I would consider it secondary to playability in your case as most of it is derived from your amp and pickups.

^ I agree. just go play a bunch of guitars.
within you lay everything
every key
every secret

untouched and in plain sight
#4
Quote by staticoverdub
i believe a maple fretboard accounts for no more than .1% of the tone of an instrument. you'd probably want something with a thin, wide neck for the sake of playability. as for sound, I would consider it secondary to playability in your case as most of it is derived from your amp and pickups.

^ I agree. just go play a bunch of guitars.



It's actually been proved that a different body wood does actually change your tone. As for the fretboard and neck thing, I just like the attack and feel that maple has

I suppose I'll just go to my local L&M and test out stuff.
Quote by satchgear
I tried it out in store.

Great neck, nice n light, good tuning stability. Overall a good guitar. I didn't but it cause I generally only buy guitars over a grand now.