#1
Hi UG,

I have a question:

I know the chords derived from the major scale

I = maj
II=min
III=min
IV=maj
V=maj
VI=min
VII=dim

This is how it is in theory. But how does this actually works in practice.
Cause i'm wondering then, how are the other chords (6th, 7th, aug, dim...)
then used?

For example: I want to play in the key of C, but can you only play the chords derived from the C major scale?
I mean instead of playin a Cmaj chord (I) in my progression,
can i also play C6 or C/G or Caug...
because you see these fancy chords all the time. But how do they work? When do you use them?

I hope my question is clear

Thanks in Advance!
#2
As far as i know, you can play any of the 6/7/9/11/13 whatever chords because the added notes are all in the key, and i'm guessing it's the same for aug/dim chords, but im' not 100% sure on those.
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#3
A C6 would just be C with the 6th note of the C major scale added. Same for all the other chords. You just have to work out if it's a minor/major 6th (or whatever interval you are choosing).

This only applies when you are creating chords from the notes in a scale, which is not compulsory.
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#4
This is where modes come into play. Imagine a C7 chord--C, E, G, and B-flat. B-flat is not in the C Major scale, but it is in F-Major. So now imagine playing an F-Major scale but starting and ending on the note C. You have just played a mode--the Mixolydian mode. It's the same as the F Major scale, but it begins and ends on the dominant. Thus, if you're taking a solo while the band is playing a C7 chord, you'll want to use the F Major scale, not the C Major.

Technically, whenever you play a dominant seventh chord (like C7) you've changed the key to the 4th above the root of the chord, although in popular music 7th chords are so common that we usually don't think of them as changing the key.
#5
Aha, so actually when i use the other chords than the Cmaj scale gives me, i will just be playing in another mode/scale.

But looking at the progression and not the soloing, it's ok? I mean if i'm playing a I IV V
i can play C7 F G, and it's alright then?

Only for the soloing it matters right?
#6
You don't tend to use fancy chords over scales, you use scales over fancy chords....it's a small distinction but an important one. Most of the time you start with a chord progression first, then your melody comes afterwards.

If you're good then you can "reverse engineer" a chord progression from a melody line but it's lot more common and also a lot easier to do it the other way round.
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#7
personally, I don't think about music theory when writing a song. most of the time I find that it limits my choices, so the only scale I recommend you follow is the chromatic :P

pretty much what I'm saying is if it sounds like a good chord to you, **** caring about scales u use.
#8
Quote by Hadeed
personally, I don't think about music theory when writing a song. most of the time I find that it limits my choices, so the only scale I recommend you follow is the chromatic :P

pretty much what I'm saying is if it sounds like a good chord to you, **** caring about scales u use.


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I too would like to use extensions more frequently, but I'm at a loss of how to write with them.
#10
Quote by Hadeed
personally, I don't think about music theory when writing a song. most of the time I find that it limits my choices, so the only scale I recommend you follow is the chromatic :P

pretty much what I'm saying is if it sounds like a good chord to you, **** caring about scales u use.


Ugh, i hate people like you...