#1
Lol, that probably didnt make any sense because im not sure how to word it.

But what im trying to find out is say if i play in the key of G major, and want to use the pentatonic minor scale, is it possible to find the equivalent of G major as a minor?

If so, is there like a formula on getting to the minor or something?

Thanks
#3
Relative minor = 6th note ??
Relative Major = 3rd note ??

I dont know...
#4
Heh, you're gonna get flamed for wanting to use a relative minor; it seems to be one of them buttons for most of the guys around here.

Regardless, to get to your relative minor from a major key, go down a minor 3rd or up a major 6th. So the relative minor of G major is E minor. To get to the relative major of a minor key, go up a minor 3rd or down a major 6th. So the relative major of E minor is G major again. Easy.
#6
If you already know your major and minor scales, just remember that the relative major is the same as the minor scale starting on the third note. For example: A minor = ABCDEFGA, and C major = CDEFGABC. It's the same pattern, and the same notes, but starting on the third note of the minor scale. Pentatonics work the same way, A minor pentatonic = ACDEGA and C major pentatonic = CDEGAC. A simpler way might be if you're playing a major scale, move 1.5 steps (3 frets) down from the root for the relative minor, and 1.5 steps up from a minor root to the relative major.
#8
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
Lol, that probably didnt make any sense because im not sure how to word it.

But what im trying to find out is say if i play in the key of G major, and want to use the pentatonic minor scale, is it possible to find the equivalent of G major as a minor?

If so, is there like a formula on getting to the minor or something?

Thanks

Relative scales contain the same notes but different interval patterns, parallel scales have different notes but the same pattern of intervals...that's all you need to know.

People facepalm relative minor threads because of the amount of misunderstanding - this one included. The "equivalent" of G major as a minor, as in "I'm in the key of G and have been using G major pentatonic but want to switch to a minor scale" is G minor.

"Playing the relative minor" won't result in you doing anything other than continuing to play in G major...the notes are the same and the tonal centre is defined by the chord progression. You may be playing a differnent shape on the fretboard but all you're doing is playing the exact same notes somewhere else...you're just playing G major pentatonic in a different place. The concept of the relative minor has nothing to do with where you play something, it simply refers to the minor key that uses the same chords.


Now, if you play the notes of G major pentatonic over a backing in the key of E minor then you're using the relative minor.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jan 25, 2009,
#9
But what im trying to find out is say if i play in the key of G major, and want to use the pentatonic minor scale, is it possible to find the equivalent of G major as a minor?


*sigh*

Keys don't work that way. If you want to play in the relative minor, write a song in the relative minor. You can't play the E minor scale over a G major progression, or the A minor scale over a C major progression. Scales are not box shapes.
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#10
AC DC Check this out...

Here's G major Pentatonic over the first 12 frets of the fretboard:
                                               12th fret
                                               v
o|---|---|-O-|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|
o|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-O-|---|-o-|---|-o-|
O|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-O-|
o|---|-o-|---|---|-O-|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|
o|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-O-|---|-o-|
o|---|---|-O-|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|
^          ^               ^                   ^
open       3rd fret        7th fret            12th fret


Compare this to the relative minor pentatonic (Em Pentatonic Scale).

                                               12th fret
                                               v
O|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-O-|
o|---|---|-o-|---|-O-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|-o-|
o|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-O-|---|---|-o-|
o|---|-O-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|
o|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-O-|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|
O|---|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|-O-|
^          ^               ^                   ^
open       3rd fret        7th fret            12th fret


Notice any similarities? The shapes and patterns are the same cause it's the same notes across the entire fretboard.

So why are they different? Cause they use different root notes (the bigger circles). In the first instance the notes will be heard in relation to G and in the second they will be heard in relation to E.

How do you make E the root note - you can do this with a well constructed melody on it's own but if there is a the chord progression underneath it will win out everytime.

If the chord progression, bass, or underlying rhythm sets a G major tonality then playing Em pentatonic shapes will still sound in relation to the G tonic set by the underlying harmony and the result will be you are playing G Major Pentatonic.

How do you switch? You have to set a new tonic through manipulating the harmony. For practice you might just try a couple simple chords to get a feel for the change in mood.

G D for like 12 bars or something then Em B for 12 bars. Just try going back and forth and feel the shift. Then try playing the patterns above over the whole thing and keep trying to feel the changes in tonality.

Best of Luck
Si