#1
The title says it all.


Any thoughts or comments as to which tremolo bridge is better?

A Gotoh Wilkinson or the good old reliable 6-hole Vintage tremolo bridge.
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#3
Have you played both?

Choose whichever you like the best.
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#4
the gotoh wilkinson is totally awesome

the next guitar i make for me is going to have one with locking tuners. they are extremely smooth and i can get them on a dealer sale for 50 bucks each in gold.
#5
Can you expound on the differences? My old American made Fender Fat Strat had the 6-hole tremolo but I've never played a Wilkinson. Does it make a difference in terms of tone or sustain? And staying in tune, I go kind of crazy with the whammy, so string slippage is of some importance.


EDIT:

Yeah, I'm getting the locking tuners too, and a graphite nut, self-lubricating and all that good stuff.
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Last edited by Seryaph at Jan 25, 2009,
#6
tone/sustain is gonna be the same, gotoh is made otu of better materials, smoother tremolo action, and you can actually use it without worrying too much about tuning. the fender whammy isreally built for vibrato, if you use it heavily it will go out of tune, locking tuners, string guide, graphite nut cut correctly, you'll stay in tune.
#7
can a wilkinson be used as a drop in replacement for a vintage trem? What I mean is will it utilize the same trem block and spring routes and the only modification being drilling the holes for the pivot points
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#8
The Wilkinsons rest on two bolts like a locking trem would, this giving it the smoother action and better tuning stability. The only thing you'd have to change about the guitar is doing the drilling for those two screws and the rest is drop-in.
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#9
Quote by Shinozoku
The Wilkinsons rest on two bolts like a locking trem would, this giving it the smoother action and better tuning stability. The only thing you'd have to change about the guitar is doing the drilling for those two screws and the rest is drop-in.


awesome, i'm planning a build for woodworking and im using a strat template for the neck and bridge so it would be correct and everything.

I like wilkinsons since they have the feel of a floyd without the string changing pains
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#10
I have a vintage syncronised style on my strat. The tuning stability is fantastic (although I don't use the trem much). It's a callaham one. Can do some small dives without any issues at all. Never tried a wilkinson, but they do look good.

My callaham bridge has great sustain due to the cold rolled steel block, but if you're a heavy trem user, you might prefer the wilkinson...
#11
Well I have a wilkinson on my Carvin and have used 6-hole vintage trems in my life, if you're planning on using it a lot then the wilkinson, it has decent tuning stability and can be used in a similar manner as a floyd rose (which is where it only hs "decent" tuning stability ) however I feel it's a bit. . .loose, not the best word, but I like my bridges to be stable as a brick ****house, but this can go out of tune if you pull up/rest your palm on it too hard. Though it is also very comfortable for the wrist for palm-muting/resting.
Though the 6-hole bridge would be best if you're lookin' for something to not have to be light on, even when slightly floating I feel the 6-holer's are a bit tougher, but not easier to use in the whammy bar'ing section.

HOpe that helps.