#1
I'm playing a progression with 4 chords that contain the following notes (lowest to highest pitch):

1:
F A C G

2:
F A C# G

3:
F A D G

4:
F A D F


Chord 1 is an Fadd9, chord 2 an Fadd9#5 and chord 4 is a Dm/F. I labelled chord 3 a Dsus4/F without really thinking about it, then thought about it and wondered if you should name it like that even though there is a non-suspended 3rd in the chord (albeit as a bass note). Does the suspended 3rd above the root trump the minor 3rd under the root for the naming of this chord? I couldn't think of anything else to name it, but having asked guitar pro, it suggets Dsus4/F, Gsus2/F, G7sus2 and Dmadd11.
Dsus4/F still makes the most sense to me - the song's in Dm, so it seems more sensible for it to be some kind of D chord than some kind of G chord. If anyone could help me out on this I'd appreciate it.

Also, if you play an add9 chord into an add9#5, it definitely sounds to me as if that's the movement happening in "The Gunners Dream" by Pink Floyd off The Final Cut. This hasn't got anything to do with my question, it was just that when I stumbled across that ^^ progression the first two chords reminded me of something.
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#2
Edit;

If there's a constant F playing as the lowest voice, then it makes more sense.

There are other ways to name it though.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 25, 2009,
#3
I think you should go with Dmadd11, it's basically a second inversion Dm with a 4 or 11.
#5
Personally I would look at it like...

Fadd9 - Fadd9#5 - F6/9 - F6

To me in that context (I imagine the chords all following each other) it seems to me it's all an F chord with a single voice moving chromatically upward all while the add9 provides tension. The final G to F movement relieves a tension that was present throughout in the form of the 9th.

That's just me though.

EDIT: what song is it? Is it the song you mentioned Gunners Dream - I'll have to listen to it? Are you sure it's Dm and not the relative major F Major?
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jan 25, 2009,
#6
Quote by aetherspear
despite popular belief, sus4 chords can have a third in them.


Then it's an Add11 chord.

Unless it's lower voiced, then it's an Cadd4 chord.

You don't make an Csus4add3 chord or something.

Major and Minor are always more important.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 25, 2009,
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
Personally I would look at it like...

Fadd9 - Fadd9#5 - F6/9 - F6

The key of F actually makes more sense than Dm to me, now that I think about it.
#8
Quote by 20Tigers
Personally I would look at it like...

Fadd9 - Fadd9#5 - F6/9 - F6

To me in that context (I imagine the chords all following each other) it seems to me it's all an F chord with a single voice moving chromatically upward all while the add9 provides tension. The final G to F movement relieves a tension that was present throughout in the form of the 9th.

That's just me though.

EDIT: what song is it? Is it the song you mentioned Gunners Dream - I'll have to listen to it? Are you sure it's Dm and not the relative major F Major?


This definitely makes more sense - the progression of chords in the verse of the song is definitely Dm, but this part being in F does make what's going on much easier to explain. It's a song I'm helping to write, btw. I just noticed when I was playing these chords that the movement in the first two sounded like The Gunner's Dream.

Thanks very much for that (everyone that answered) - does this explanation ^^ look like it makes the most sense to everyone?
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
Last edited by Damascus at Jan 25, 2009,
#9
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Then it's an Add11 chord.

Unless it's lower voiced, then it's an Cadd4 chord.

You don't make an Csus4add3 chord or something.

Major and Minor are always more important.



The fourth doesn't take take the place of the third in a sus chord, according to Mark Levine anyway.
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#10
^ true. There's also three parts aren't there? The preparation the suspension and the resolve? Something like that.

But in popular interpretation a sus chord means "4th instead of 3rd".
Si