#1
Im not really sure, but what are the main differences between the two of these other than the finish and the name on the headstock? Im looking into buying a new guitar and I cant decide between the two.

Does one play/sound better than the other? Pickup quality etc.

Thanks.
#2
the gibson one probably has different (maybe better) pickups, and may be made out of a different wood
Epiphone G-400
Yamaha Pacifica (Mod on hold due to procrastination)
Rocktron Banshee
Marshall 10CD

Quote by geetarguy13

I've never smoked before but it looks like fun.
#5
I'd go with the Studio, it will last you.
New Setup:
Epiphone Les Paul Custom (Black SG w/ 3 Hum.)
Peavey Classic 50
EHX Metal Muff
Cry Baby 535Q


"I'm the one that's got to die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to"
Jimi Hendrix
#6
I'd get the epi. I ended up liking most of the epis that I've played better than most of the gibsons at the gibson showcase in nashville
Quote by webbtje
A woman's perspective is great, you get to stare down at least one top without anyone caring.
#7
Quote by Knoknonhvnsdoor
Im not really sure, but what are the main differences between the two of these other than the finish and the name on the headstock? Im looking into buying a new guitar and I cant decide between the two.

Gibson uses real african mahogany, Epiphone uses a cheaper wood called NATO (which is aka Indonesian mahogany bc if of it's similar properties to mahogany)


Does one play/sound better than the other? Pickup quality etc.


They sound different, the LP studio has a maple top, which gives it a brighter, snappier sound, the LP custom doesn't have a maple top so it would sound darker, I'd liken the tone of a LP custom to chocolate syrup, thick, dark, kind gooey sounding, doesn't have the airy honk of a maple topped les paul. I'm not a huge fan to be honest, even of the Gibson les paul customs.

Other than that, nitrocellulose vs. polyurethane finish, the studio's finish will wear in, the pickups in the Gibson are better, but it's not that big a deal because they're still not great, and most people switch them out. If binding matters to you then you might want to go with the Custom. Although I think the wine red and fireburst les paul studios actually look nicer without binding (though I'd never buy a black or sunburst les paul without binding)
#8
Quote by al112987
Gibson uses real african mahogany, Epiphone uses a cheaper wood called NATO (which is aka Indonesian mahogany bc if of it's similar properties to mahogany)

If you say NATO wouldn't that be like the North Atlantic Treaty Organization?
#9
Quote by Pac_man0123
The Gibson will also be made of real Mahogany instead of some kind of Nato or something.
I've been looking into this over the last couple of weeks since people started mentioning it here. I was pretty sure this wasn't true after Epiphone cut alder out of their production line several years ago.

After some frantic reading, e-mailing and phoning, I've come to the following conclusion. Note this is supported by Epiphone's PR, three independent luthiers and two stores (non-chain):

Current Epiphones (i.e. ones made from 2008 and on) are made with two or three piece solid mahogany bodies. Two pieces are used on Customs, signature series, Ultras and so on; three pieces are used on Standards and below. Types of mahogany used are Shorea (Philippine mahogany) and Myroxylon Balsamum (Santos mahogany), depending on the season and factory the guitar is made in.


For what it's worth, Santos mahogany is the same mahogany used in most production-level Gibsons in the late 70's until the mid 90's. Philippine mahogany is somewhat worse and it's sketchy whether or not it should really be called mahogany, but it is a definite step up from Eastern mahogany (NATO).


Also what's worth bearing in mind is there's more to wood than just it's name. Lots of people think alder is better than poplar, but high-grade poplar beats the pants of low-grade alder.
And when it comes to that, while the Epis are made out of what appears to be, on close inspection, mid-grade (C or D Select) cheaper mahogany, the Gibson Studios (at least the one I was able to get a verdict on, of course all guitars could be slightly different) appear to be made of lower-grade (No.2 Common) 'better' mahogany.

So you're trading off average cheap mahogany for poor expensive mahogany.



That aside, the main thing to note with the Studio vs the Epi is the finish. Epiphone uses a thick poly-based finish, Gibson use a thinner nitro-based finish. Many people have a distinct preference for one type of finish over the other as it effects not only the look but also the tone and playability of the guitar. Pretty much for this reason alone you need to go to a store and play some yourself to be able to tell which you prefer.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#10
ive owned BOTH guitars..........still own one of them. I actually had a white custom, and returned it because the studio felt that much better to me.
Guitars
1998 Gibson Les Paul Standard
1992 Ibanez RG550
Amplifier
1978 Marshall JMP 2203
#12
the philippine mahogany is softer.. imagine an ibanez rg321 that's made in indonesia.. i think it's made of philippine mahogany.. it's the one my brother owns.. well, after a year of having it, the string ferrules seem to be eating the wood (if that's the right term).. i mean, the string ferrules kinda gets pulled in by the tension of the strings.. so manybe it's not that hard.. but id's definitely lighter..

for the price, i think i'd still go for the epi.. i think most of the higher end epi models compete with the mid end gibsons.. and the studio is in the low end gibsons.. so i guess the epi custom would be a better choice.. then buy some nice pickups if you have some money left.. that's my opinion..
Gear:

PRS SE Standard
Ibanez AEG8E-NT w/ Seymour Duncan Woody SC
Yupangco Classical Guitar
Korg AX5G
Marshall MG50DFX
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#14
Gibson: 490 series picukps (better than alnico classic from epiphone in my opinion, the epis are a bit muddy imo), same woods, but better cuts, not as visually pleasing without binding, better tuners, better craftsmanship on the frets and such, and made in USA, and hardcase

Epiphone: Not a bad guitar at all, i have an epi standard plustop and i changed out the pickups and it is a great guitar, but the gibson can be hard to beat

I am not saying that every gibson is better, but that in a general trend the gibson studio will be a higher quality guitar, while there are some gems out there from epiphone that will outshine some low end gibsons.

TRY the gibson and the epi and see which one is more fittable in your budget and your needs.
GEAR:
1959 Vintage Gibson Melody Maker
Fender Stratocaster
Martin OMM
Epi Les Paul Std
Pitchblack
Dunlop Wah
EHX Russian Big Muff
EHX Holy Grail Reverb
Palomino V16

For pictures of my gear click http://s464.photobucket.com/albums/rr8/spoutz/Guitar Gear/?albumview=grid nao!

-Matt

Sláinte

#15
You really need to try both. As far as feel and palyability they are both pretty much the same the problem I find is most guitars I try are never set up right no matter who makes them. It would really be a big help if the retailers would go the extra yard and set them up before they put them out. I have played Gibbys that don't compare with a lot of Epis I have played. The Gibson pups are suposed to be better but truthfully some of the Epis I own have pretty hot pups that I easily can live with a few actually came with Gibson USA pups and one has Original Bill Lawrence pups stock and they sound amazing. I am a huge Gibby fan but I am very dissapointed in what's been coming out of their factory lately.

Again you need to go an play both and while your there play a few others too. That is if you can go try them somehwere. I really likr the Epi Prophecy line of LPs myself and would by either one of those over most other LP shaped guitars.

John
#16
I prefer the thinner neck on the Epi vs the baseball bat neck of say the VM and other studio's

after pup and other electronics changes they are great guitars
#17
For the price of a studio, I'd get a really nice Japanese Tokai Loverock.
Much better guitar, no compromise on the hardware.
Quote by Skraeling86
That's a lot of booze. Frankly, I'm impressed. You're of a stronger timber than the average man, jimbob! Hail you.



Quote by Bubban
Yes you should go to a doctor, fucking moron. We can't do anything about your hemorrhoid.


#18
Quote by jimbob78
For the price of a studio, I'd get a really nice Japanese Tokai Loverock.
Much better guitar, no compromise on the hardware.

MIJ (NOT MIK) Love rocks cost a fair bit more than studios. At least here in the USA.
Quote by deltacross
the philippine mahogany is softer.. imagine an ibanez rg321 that's made in indonesia.. i think it's made of philippine mahogany.. it's the one my brother owns.. well, after a year of having it, the string ferrules seem to be eating the wood (if that's the right term).. i mean, the string ferrules kinda gets pulled in by the tension of the strings.. so manybe it's not that hard.. but id's definitely lighter..

for the price, i think i'd still go for the epi.. i think most of the higher end epi models compete with the mid end gibsons.. and the studio is in the low end gibsons.. so i guess the epi custom would be a better choice.. then buy some nice pickups if you have some money left.. that's my opinion..


The custom is not a high end Epi, higher end Epis are MIJ Elitist and "Epiphone by Gibson" models.
Quote by MrFlibble

After some frantic reading, e-mailing and phoning, I've come to the following conclusion. Note this is supported by Epiphone's PR, three independent luthiers and two stores (non-chain):

Current Epiphones (i.e. ones made from 2008 and on) are made with two or three piece solid mahogany bodies. Two pieces are used on Customs, signature series, Ultras and so on; three pieces are used on Standards and below. Types of mahogany used are Shorea (Philippine mahogany) and Myroxylon Balsamum (Santos mahogany), depending on the season and factory the guitar is made in.


For what it's worth, Santos mahogany is the same mahogany used in most production-level Gibsons in the late 70's until the mid 90's. Philippine mahogany is somewhat worse and it's sketchy whether or not it should really be called mahogany, but it is a definite step up from Eastern mahogany (NATO).

They might have changed it since 2008 then, I actually asked Epiphone and Gibson PR about what their guitars are made out of and for the standards at least, they said it was NATO, it could be different for the Customs or they might have changed the design.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 26, 2009,
#19
Quote by al112987
They might have changed it since 2008 then, I actually asked Epiphone and Gibson PR about what their guitars are made out of and for the standards at least, they said it was NATO, it could be different for the Customs or they might have changed the design.
Doesn't surprise me. They've already changed their production design six times since 2000. If this is change #7 then that's just par for the course.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#20
i use to have that epiphone... meh.
go gibby.
Quote by slickerthnsleek
YOU WIN THE INTERNET.
Quote by dxpaintball8000
long live bucketmark.
#22
if you ccan get the gib, get the gib as some1 alrdy said it'll last you longer