#1
I was thinking about creating my own practice routine and I'd like to hear your opinion about it.

Monday
-Sweep picking training with metronome
-Check some song with sweep picking
-Make own sweeping riffs.

Tuesday
-Alternative picking training with metronome
-Check out song with alternative picking
-Try also economy picking and chicken picking.

Wednesday
-String skipping training with metronome
-Check out song with string skipping
-Legato training with metronome.

Thursday
-Tapping training with metronome
-Repeating familiar scales and modes
-Learn or start learning a new song.

Friday
-Try to make your own song
-Ear training
-Transcribe a song into a tab.
-Bending and vibrato training.

Saturday
-Learning new theory and repeating what you already know.
-Recording

Sunday
-Repeat stuff you have learned
-Jam and solo over some looped chords.
-Have fun and relax for mondays training.

What do you think? I think I'd be focusing around 1-5 hours a day playing guitar using these methods. 1-3 hour or as much I can if my band practices come in way but 5 or even more if I can't find nothing better to do.
#2
jesus christ! you're so ****ing organized. just chill out and play
equipment:
Esp EC-1000
ibanez rg550
Peavey 5150 combo
Boss ML-2 Metal core pedal
DB-01 crybaby from hell

Quote by dubstar92
Tell the friend that due to an amp explosion you are now temporarily deaf and will judge her friend solely on looks.
#3
Yes, focusing on one principle at a time, especially an advanced technique such as sweeping can help, but only working on sweep picking for the whole day.

I would suggest making a daily plan including warming up, working on simple things like posture and timing and exercises. The every week make a plan for the next week considering the advanced techniques you touched on in your post.

Thats my recommendation.

Origionaly Posted by CTFOD
Origionaly Posted by hownowbrowncow:
Get a new bicycle
Then you can ride it with no handlebars.

No handlebars.

No handlebars...
#4
Quote by kazra90
jesus christ! you're so ****ing organized. just chill out and play


Yeah but these won't always go like they are there written but that's the pattern I try to follow

Quote by Tenacious D'er
I would suggest making a daily plan including warming up, working on simple things like posture and timing and exercises. The every week make a plan for the next week considering the advanced techniques you touched on in your post.


How would you suggest me training timing? I can't come up anything but playing along some track, jamming and using metronome.

The every week plan that you mentioned sounds really cool I think I'll start of with this one and then start fixing it slowly at places where I need more training. Thanks for the tip!
Last edited by Punkismygod at Jan 25, 2009,
#5
I used to just jam, and try and transcribe songs I liked, but I got a book on how to shred, so I follow that, and work on various scale sequences, both as a drill, and in the context of songs. And I always use a metronome.
#6
Quote by Glavinage
I used to just jam, and try and transcribe songs I liked, but I got a book on how to shred, so I follow that, and work on various scale sequences, both as a drill, and in the context of songs. And I always use a metronome.


What book did you get? Do you think it is available in Finland?
#7
Quote by Punkismygod
How would you suggest me training timing? I can't come up anything but playing along some track, jamming and using metronome.

The every week plan that you mentioned sounds really cool I think I'll start of with this one and then start fixing it slowly at places where I need more training. Thanks for the tip!


Well, start with single note whole notes on a comfortable tempo, the start dividing the beat, half notes, quarter, mean-time you can be trying whole notes on a faster tempo. Tehn maybe starting chromatic or other lick or exercise to these tempos and being able to stay in time, also being able to stop momentarily and then being able to pick up the beat again maybe. Constantly challange yourself.

Also your welcome, glad to help. Good idea modifying your plans, document them as you make them so if your stuck for one you can go back and re-use one.

If you start feeling your lacking in practice of some technique then allocate a couple days to it etc.

Good luck!

Origionaly Posted by CTFOD
Origionaly Posted by hownowbrowncow:
Get a new bicycle
Then you can ride it with no handlebars.

No handlebars.

No handlebars...
#8
Quote by Tenacious D'er
Well, start with single note whole notes on a comfortable tempo, the start dividing the beat, half notes, quarter, mean-time you can be trying whole notes on a faster tempo. Tehn maybe starting chromatic or other lick or exercise to these tempos and being able to stay in time, also being able to stop momentarily and then being able to pick up the beat again maybe. Constantly challange yourself.



I've never thought actually that! That sounds something that would also improve alot my ****ty improvising! Thanks a lot dude you've been great help
#9
Quote by Punkismygod
That sounds something that would also improve alot my ****ty improvising!


For improvising I would take a simple lick/concept and get a backing track and try to be able to keep close to that lick yet use phrasing to keep it interesting, also being able to change key or scale that you are using with the lick.

Record it if you can and review yourself, try to see if it gets boring or if your able to keep it interesting.

Origionaly Posted by CTFOD
Origionaly Posted by hownowbrowncow:
Get a new bicycle
Then you can ride it with no handlebars.

No handlebars.

No handlebars...
#10
I don't think is a good idea to practice one particular technique per day because for example on mondays you practice sweep picking but you won't practice it again until after another week. That really doesn't work at all, you need to practice all techniques regualrly.
Also, practicing the same technique for 3-5 hours is not gonna make you better unless you do the same the next day or two.

What you should do is practice all of the techniques everyday, each one for an equal amount of time (unless one particular technique requires more practice, in which case you would spend more time on that). You don't have to practice one single technique for many hours; if you have 3 hours a day to practice, spend 30 minutes on each then combine them for say another 30 minutes, and for the last hour review everything or learn a song that has many of those techniques (figure out how much time you can put onto each technique daily).
You can do that let's say Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays, and the other days do theory, ear training and songwriting. Or practice tehniques everyday but on certain days you do theory, ear training and songwriting/recording; something like that.
What's important is that you practice everything regularly not once a week, your brain and hands need to repeat certain patterns and ideas on a regular basis, that way you will learn things much faster.

Also remember to take regular short (10-15 min) breaks after a few hours (2-3), when you come back from a break your mind is more focused on whatever you are about to do, instead of nonstop practice because after many hours, your brain will not be as focused as it was when you started, so make sure you do that.
Last edited by TrasherFromHell at Jan 25, 2009,
#11
Quote by Punkismygod
What book did you get? Do you think it is available in Finland?


I got a book called DVD Guitar Shred its published by Hal Leonard.
No idea if its available in Finland, I live in the US
#12
You're not spending enough time jamming. Seriously if you're practicing five hours a day then two or three of those should be spent jamming. Find a band, use backing tracks, or just stick on the radio and play along (actually that's probably the best choice; it'll stop you repeating yourself). Jamming gives you technique, ear training and composition all in one. Any technical excercises you do should be in order to play those things you hear in your head while you try to jam and can't. Any pieces you study should be in order to learn new tricks to use while you jam.
#13
Quote by Tenacious D'er

I would suggest making a daily plan including warming up, working on simple things like posture and timing and exercises.


Good advice. What most people overlook in their practicing is the simple things,
and it's really the simple things that make or break you.

Timing is one area that just seems to be overlooked. You can't practice this enough.
(and I don't think it's practiced very much judging by what I hear).

Timing is the foundation almost everything else rests on. A good thing to do, if you
can, is record your timing practice with a metronome click to a WAV file. Open it in
software that shows you waveforms and visually compare the click peak with your
playing peaks. You might be surprised how much ahead or behind the beat you
play at even moderate speeds. It's a good idea to practice hitting the click EXACTLY
under various circumstances and speeds. This is about control. In playing it's
certainly desirable to lag or anticipate the beat, but you want it to be on purpose.
#14
How's about the fact that you should actually learn chords too? You'll be a lot better at lead playing if you understand how chords work, no better way to learn them than to play them.

And i'm talking all chords, not just power chords.

Also, you seem to be pretty good from what i've seen on your youtube.
Try unanchoring....but that's a totally separate thread.....
Last edited by Ikonoklast at Jan 26, 2009,
#15
I think you are on the wrong track if you've dedicated a practice session to alternate picking....
#17
Quote by Kaos_00
I think you are on the wrong track if you've dedicated a practice session to alternate picking....


That's probably because I want to learn pick perfecly, cleanly and pure at any speed.

Quote by Ikonoklast
How's about the fact that you should actually learn chords too? You'll be a lot better at lead playing if you understand how chords work, no better way to learn them than to play them.

And i'm talking all chords, not just power chords.

Also, you seem to be pretty good from what i've seen on your youtube.
Try unanchoring....but that's a totally separate thread.....


I know the basic chords and some more advanced ones Even if I don't know the chord I know how to build it but I see your point there : ) I'll do most of my chords training with arpeggios using sweeping and string skipping technique if that counts.

I haven't realy paied attention on ancouring or not I've just played how I think it is the best. Isn't unancouring playing without toching the guitar with ur right hand? I ignore this mostly because I like to do lot's of palm mutes when I play leads.

Quote by edg
Good advice. What most people overlook in their practicing is the simple things,
and it's really the simple things that make or break you.

Timing is one area that just seems to be overlooked. You can't practice this enough.
(and I don't think it's practiced very much judging by what I hear).

Timing is the foundation almost everything else rests on. A good thing to do, if you
can, is record your timing practice with a metronome click to a WAV file. Open it in
software that shows you waveforms and visually compare the click peak with your
playing peaks. You might be surprised how much ahead or behind the beat you
play at even moderate speeds. It's a good idea to practice hitting the click EXACTLY
under various circumstances and speeds. This is about control. In playing it's
certainly desirable to lag or anticipate the beat, but you want it to be on purpose.


This looks like an interesting thing to try, I'll give it a shot

Quote by anotherbluesguy
You're not spending enough time jamming. Seriously if you're practicing five hours a day then two or three of those should be spent jamming. Find a band, use backing tracks, or just stick on the radio and play along (actually that's probably the best choice; it'll stop you repeating yourself). Jamming gives you technique, ear training and composition all in one. Any technical excercises you do should be in order to play those things you hear in your head while you try to jam and can't. Any pieces you study should be in order to learn new tricks to use while you jam.


I didn't really mention the jamming thing there but when I'm playing with my band we jam together almost all the time. Sometimes we play these heavy powerchord progressions and do some solos over them but sometimes we really focuse on jamming doing some cool jazz and funk.

I really don't like using the radio while training because every second song that comes at ANY radio station here is just some teenage subwhoofer crap and I can't stand that. I like to download some backing tracks and try to solo over those or then loop couple chords and try to jam over them. Maybe I could try turning the radio on when ever there comes something listenable : )

Quote by TrasherFromHell
I don't think is a good idea to practice one particular technique per day because for example on mondays you practice sweep picking but you won't practice it again until after another week. That really doesn't work at all, you need to practice all techniques regualrly.
Also, practicing the same technique for 3-5 hours is not gonna make you better unless you do the same the next day or two.

What you should do is practice all of the techniques everyday, each one for an equal amount of time (unless one particular technique requires more practice, in which case you would spend more time on that). You don't have to practice one single technique for many hours; if you have 3 hours a day to practice, spend 30 minutes on each then combine them for say another 30 minutes, and for the last hour review everything or learn a song that has many of those techniques (figure out how much time you can put onto each technique daily).
You can do that let's say Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays, and the other days do theory, ear training and songwriting. Or practice tehniques everyday but on certain days you do theory, ear training and songwriting/recording; something like that.
What's important is that you practice everything regularly not once a week, your brain and hands need to repeat certain patterns and ideas on a regular basis, that way you will learn things much faster.

Also remember to take regular short (10-15 min) breaks after a few hours (2-3), when you come back from a break your mind is more focused on whatever you are about to do, instead of nonstop practice because after many hours, your brain will not be as focused as it was when you started, so make sure you do that.


This response was actually the most rational of all, thank you good sir! I will try this one for sure.

Can someone still give me more good advices of practing with ear, timing and warming up? I usually just warm up using this kind of a joe satriani technique wich I saw in one of his vids.


e||------------------4---1-------------------|
B||----------4--1----3---2----4---1----------|
G||--4----1--3--2----2---3----3---2--4---1---|
D||--3----2--2--3----1---4----2---3--3---2---|
A||--2----3--1--4-------------1---4--2---3---|
E||--1----4--------------------------1---4---|


Moving this up and down the neck cromaticly. I also use the technique where I just alternative the cromatic scale up and down.

Thank you all for your responses!
Last edited by Punkismygod at Jan 26, 2009,
#19
I know the basic chords and some more advanced ones Even if I don't know the chord I know how to build it but I see your point there : ) I'll do most of my chords training with arpeggios using sweeping and string skipping technique if that counts.


This is a good thing, but you should also play the chords and play through chord progressions in addition to it, keep your options open

I haven't realy paied attention on ancouring or not I've just played how I think it is the best. Isn't unancouring playing without toching the guitar with ur right hand? I ignore this mostly because I like to do lot's of palm mutes when I play leads.


Read the anchoring thread, i don't want to open up a can of worms in here!