#1
I'm planning on forming a band this year but I have something I'm worrying about. I'm planning on there being two lead vocalists/songwriters, me being one. So the songs we play will be written by both of us, but IF the band does split, who claims ownership of the songs if we both contributed to them?

#2
No one gets them.

They go to the none writing/vocalists.


Edit: Seriously, I don't know.. but I think you would just have to work it out.
#3
In New Zealand you get automatic copyright for anything you make (pretty sure), I think it' s intellectual property of the band, or maybe just you 2, dunno.
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#4
something similar happened to me, but after he got them because he formed another band with our past drummer, so he had the mayority of the band in his new band, but i was alone in another band, but after all i went pretty good, i have better songs now, check out http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/azoteaa/
#5
Study Pink Floyd's legal battles, that should give you a sense of something...
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#6
dude your just starting a band and your already thinking about the break up? be positive!
#7
well it depends, i think technically anything co-written by you guys would belong to the both of you, meaning you both have the right to use the song how you see fit when money isn't involved but when it is both sides will probably have to agree on the deal, as for the songs written by you and the songs written by him the ones you wrote are yours and the ones he wrote his.
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#8
i think you both get equal rights to the songs
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#9
you're just starting a band.. 99.9999999999999% of the time you won't make it past a few local gigs at best... if you do "make it", you aren't gonna use your first songs ever written... don't worry about it.. have fun
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#10
Quote by F8iscruel
well it depends, i think technically anything co-written by you guys would belong to the both of you, meaning you both have the right to use the song how you see fit when money isn't involved but when it is both sides will probably have to agree on the deal, as for the songs written by you and the songs written by him the ones you wrote are yours and the ones he wrote his.


this

Now, whether you both own the songs equally depends on whether you wrote them equally. This is where lots of disputes come from. McCartney went through a fairly lengthy legal battle because all the songs written by him are listed as Lennon/McCartney (alphabetical), and even if McCartney wrote the bulk of the song for a number of them, they're still never listed as McCartney/Lennon.

It has the potential to have monetary implications, as well as control rights.

If the co-writership is agreed to be equal, then you list the names alphabetically. Where it really makes a difference is how you divvy up the porportions when you register the songs with your performing rights organization and your mechanical licensing organization. For a bit more on that, check the 'copyright for dummies' thread in Musician Talk that is starting to take shape.

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