#1
In the next few months my band will be recording at a studio completely out of our own pocket. However, in the past when we have done home recordings and such one of our guitarist can't handle having what he plays recorded. Whenever we start recording he just messes up his part, it becomes a very difficult task to record. Does anyone have any tips on how to get our guitarist to loosen up? At this point anything will be helpful, we need to save all the money we can.
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#4
He can play his part perfectly when not being recorded, but once we start recording him he just messes up uncontrollably. He isnt that shy of a person so I really dont know
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#5
It just take practice and patience. Another thing is that you might want to let him record after everyone else did their part. I had a very similar problem when i had to record without the vocal tracks (i'd get confused and forget what part i'm in). Also, you can have him record the track all the way through and then have him record it again over that and then just delete the first one. Doing so will help figure out where he's at and reduce some pressure about being afraid of messing up.
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#6
Theres a name for this, i cant remember it though, at a guess i think its "red light fever" or something.

I was reading abour it, apparently its quite common amongst musicians (specifically vocalist), as soon as the red light goes on to show that they're being recorded, they panic and get hit by the nerves.

I think its just a matter of practising, perhaps hes just got to learn to say '**** it', take deep breaths and relax, and just focus on his playing, not the fact that hes being recorded.
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#7
Quote by captaincrunk
Just have him "practice" a few times before, while you're actually recording. tell him he has to nail it once first



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#8
Oh back in my early days I was like that. I had the "fear of the red button." For some people it can be stage fright X 10. Studio is different that the rehearsal room in many ways. The biggest change is the fact that you wear headphones. When you are listening to yourself play through headphones you hear every little nuance in your playing and that can through you off. He should practice guitar with headphones so he can get used to that feel.

I also used to think ", since I'm going into the studio I have to write the ultimate solo." Bad idea. If you write a really technical solo that you can barely play at home, there is a fat chance you'll tag it in the studio under 25 takes.

Keep rocking and good luck in the studio. Wish I was going to the studio soon.
AL
#10
It's perfectly common to tweak out a bit. Just play it off like you're practicing, and don't let him know you're recording. After a few recordings he should be fine because he will get use to it. Just let him have fun
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#11
it happens to me too.
Ehh. it gets better with time though. not that that really helps you but. . .

Something that helps me, is to not have anyone else in the room. I can get alot more focused without distractions. Though for him it could be exactly opposite and he needs people in there to "encourage" him. I don't know, I am just throwing thoughts out.

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#12
Quote by M_G
Theres a name for this, i cant remember it though, at a guess i think its "red light fever" or something.

I was reading abour it, apparently its quite common amongst musicians (specifically vocalist), as soon as the red light goes on to show that they're being recorded, they panic and get hit by the nerves.

I think its just a matter of practising, perhaps hes just got to learn to say '**** it', take deep breaths and relax, and just focus on his playing, not the fact that hes being recorded.


Red Light Fever is the excact name for it

just tell him to relax, take some breaths and rock
#13
id say for him, have the least people in the studio possible (scrutinizing him) while he is tracking. if you trust him, just let it be him and the engineer while tracking until he gets comfortable. the studio doesnt bother me at all, but when you have five guys just watching you mess up and talking about it it can get pretty frustrating. i like to just be there with me and whomever is engineering and then just let it flow.
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#14
Have another guitarist record his parts? Really, you'd be surprised how soon he will shape up.
#16
Well, there are some good advices here, but if he really sucks then find a new guitarist.
Otherwise if he only sucks in the studio you should record his parts (be sure that he doesn't suck at rehearsals and hides behind the noise).