#1
So with major part of co5, the dominant and subdominant are right and left of the tonic in the major version, but does this work with minor keys as well, since IV is minor and V is major (in the minor scale)?
Last edited by DegaMeth at Jan 26, 2009,
#3
its the same.. to the left the iv to the right the v
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#4
Constructing triads from each degree of the natural minor scale, you get a minor V and not a major V, so yes, it works.

As for using a major V and the circle of fifths, just see it as it is: you get the major V by raising the 7th degree of the natural minor scale with an accidential, but you "start out" with a minor V.


Also, note I'm well aware that a major V in a minor key is more usual than a minor V, I'm also aware of the (especially on the interwebz) common practise of capitalising major chords and not minor chords when writing them in roman numerals, but since TS did not I decided to go the same way. Feel free to correct me if my reasoning is somehow flawed though.
#5
So if the TS asks a question that contains inaccurate information already, we should just proceed and not correct him?

Major chords are capital and minor chords are lowercase. V is a major chord and v is a minor chord.
#7
I've played the guitar for a decade and taken lessons with many musicians with bachelor's and master's degrees in music; I have never seen that done. It is incorrect and confusing. The system I described conveys more information with the same amount of letters.
#8
First of all, this is quite irrelevant to the thread. IIRC there was a thread some time ago about this, might want to check that out. Also, you are on a different continent, customs are different everywhere. While I prefer and use the system you describe, I wanted to get my point across to the TS (who was using all capitals), not anyone else.

Also, all my litterature is in swedish (not to say not here ), but:

"Many analysts use lower-case Roman numerals to indicate minor triads and upper-case for major ones, with degree and plus signs (o and +) to indicate diminished and augmented triads, respectively. When they are not used, all the numerals are capital, and the qualities of the chords are inferred from the other scale degrees that chord contains; for example, a chord built on VI in C major would contain the notes A, C, and E, and would therefore be a minor triad. Chords that are not on the scale can be indicated by placing a flat/sharp sign before the chord — for example, the chord of E flat major in the key of C major is represented by ♭III."

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_(music)#Constructing_and_naming_chords - not the best source but I don't know any other sources regarding music theory in english.


EDIT: sp
#9
Quote by descara
Constructing triads from each degree of the natural minor scale, you get a minor V and not a major V, so yes, it works.

As for using a major V and the circle of fifths, just see it as it is: you get the major V by raising the 7th degree of the natural minor scale with an accidential, but you "start out" with a minor V.


Also, note I'm well aware that a major V in a minor key is more usual than a minor V, I'm also aware of the (especially on the interwebz) common practise of capitalising major chords and not minor chords when writing them in roman numerals, but since TS did not I decided to go the same way. Feel free to correct me if my reasoning is somehow flawed though.



Could you explain this please. I made an error saying the dominant chord was major in minor keys..when i run through my keyboard on Aminor scale i get

Aminor
Bdiminished
Cmajor
Dminor
Eminor
Fmajor
Gmajor


also i wasnt aware of the upper and lower case so cheers for pointing that out, even if it is a misnomer.
#10
That's what you get if you follow standard ways of building triads, but the V or V7 chord provides a much better resolution to the i chord than the v chord; thus it is incredibly common to use E or E7 in the key of Am, so much so that E is considered to be in the key of Am and Em would be unusual.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's what you get if you follow standard ways of building triads, but the V or V7 chord provides a much better resolution to the i chord than the v chord; thus it is incredibly common to use E or E7 in the key of Am, so much so that E is considered to be in the key of Am and Em would be unusual.



Thanks