#1
I'm usually a metalhead for the most part, but i recently started listening to Greg Howe and I love his tone and style of playing. What tips do you have for getting that sort of jazzy tone? also what scales besides major and mixolydian are good for jazz?
#2
Well, traditionally, you'd play Jazz on a hollowbody, but rolling your tone knob off can help you get that round, mellow sound. Flatwound strings will also help to smooth out your tone.

As far as the scales...you should probably find yourself a teacher or a book. You can't just pick a scale - it goes way beyond that.
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#3
I'm on my phone now so I'll post more later but you should listen to alot of jazz to get the fell for it. Also learn bebop major, and minor. You'll be able to get some miles out of that
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#4
Get a good teacher, learn to read music, and pick up a few good theory textbooks. There are no "jazz scales" or "jazz chords".
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#5
Quote by tearsofmyguitar
I'm usually a metalhead for the most part, but i recently started listening to Greg Howe and I love his tone and style of playing. What tips do you have for getting that sort of jazzy tone? also what scales besides major and mixolydian are good for jazz?



Jazz is a style. Playing chords and scales common to the style, will not make you sound like the style. To learn more about jazz..... go to the music itself. Listen to jazz, learn the music, learn what's going in the music, and most importantly, enjoy the music.

If you can, get a teacher who can guide you. There is alot to it. Way more than you could ever learn in an internet forum.
#6
what they said, but for tone, use the neck pickup and roll off most of the tone. Bonus tone points for using your thumb instead of a pick.
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#8
Quote by aetherspear
what they said, but for tone, use the neck pickup and roll off most of the tone. Bonus tone points for using your thumb instead of a pick.


That's nice tone, I prefer using a bit of overdrive though. Natural overdrive, so like a clean tube-cranked channel.

I feel this gives it a fatter tone, which comes closer to a brass instrument.

I never got why Jazz guitarists want uber clean tone, when old jazz tones were totally the opposite, like miles davis and the like.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZKqZHqMtOg&feature=related
This is kinda what I mean, slightly raspy tone, cuts better through the mix as well.

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#9
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I never got why Jazz guitarists want uber clean tone, when old jazz tones were totally the opposite, like miles davis and the like.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZKqZHqMtOg&feature=related
This is kinda what I mean, slightly raspy tone, cuts better through the mix as well.


I think it just sounds that way on the old, low quality recordings. DISCLAIMER: I don't listen to much 'old jazz', whatever that might be defined as.
#10
Quote by xxdarrenxx
That's nice tone, I prefer using a bit of overdrive though. Natural overdrive, so like a clean tube-cranked channel.

I feel this gives it a fatter tone, which comes closer to a brass instrument.

I never got why Jazz guitarists want uber clean tone, when old jazz tones were totally the opposite, like miles davis and the like.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZKqZHqMtOg&feature=related
This is kinda what I mean, slightly raspy tone, cuts better through the mix as well.

I kind of agree. I don't like complete cleans, but not as overdriven as scofield's either.
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#11
Quote by aetherspear
I kind of agree. I don't like complete cleans, but not as overdriven as scofield's either.


Yer.

I like clean for rhythm stuff, but I just feel that pure clean for single notes doesn't have much character without that driven fuzzyness

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#12
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Yer.

I like clean for rhythm stuff, but I just feel that pure clean for single notes doesn't have much character without that driven fuzzyness



I love it. Wes Montgomery' sound has plenty of character. (so do lots of jazz players that play clean).

The character comes from the player.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXOrj7QAc8M

That "pure clean" sound for single notes is entirely appropriate here.


It's just a sound.

If you don't like it, thats fine, but the lack of character issue is a matter of you failing to recognize/appreciate what's there. You have alot of talent. I hope for your sake that you one day learn to appreciate rather than judge.


More great playing with a pure clean jazz sound:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXvdU7f-q7I
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 27, 2009,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
I love it. Wes Montgomery' sound has plenty of character. (so do lots of jazz players that play clean).



Absolutely.

I think there's a reason for the pure, clean sound -- dynamics. You get the maximum
dynamic expression from the strings themselves this way and to large extent that's
what the jazz style of playing is about.

Anytime you add distortion, compression or whatnot, you're removing dynamics
from the sound.

Personally, I find pure, raw, less equipment-ridden tone to be a LOT more interesting
to listen to. I almost always practice with a "Jazz Chorus" kind of tone. It can be
quite rich to play with (especially with the neck pickup). I'll use some distortion
and compression for playing as the music calls for it, but in the long run I'd get
bored listening to much of that.
#14
hmm.. well depending if youre talking about the 40s and 50s then yes clean tones. But i personally love john mclaughlins tones, and even some of al di meolas.
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#15
^ yeah, I like them too, but what VERSION of them? Something like "Birds of Fire"
isn't really jazz. I like the tone he gets there. It's gritty and still has a lot of dynamics --
not compressed for infinite sustain. Then of course there's all the acoustic stuff they've
done -- it's hard to point at either of them as being an example of a particular sound
(without being more specific) since they've done a wide variety of stuff. Anyway, it's
just personal taste. I like gritty. I like a dynamic tone. Nothing wrong with other types
of tone.