#1
in describing amps and tones, i have heard people use the word "articulate". in music, im pretty sure articulations means stuff like staccato, legato, marcato. and in amps, i think its kind of like how tight an amp is, but im sure its more specific than that. anybody?
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#2
I've considered it to be how well it pronounces notes which is also due to how dynamic it is, quite a hard term to nail down though.
#3
To me, an articulate sound is when you can play with LOTS of gain, really fast, and in the lower range of the guitar and still hear every note with clarity

Note: This also has alot to do with technique
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#4
so, kind of like a rectifier at low volume covered up with a blanket compared to a cranked JCM800?
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

Quote by AsOneIStand
Head and Cab for $130? You don't need a head and cabinet, you need a psychological examination.
#5
Quote by Doodleface
To me, an articulate sound is when you can play with LOTS of gain, really fast, and in the lower range of the guitar and still hear every note with clarity

Note: This also has alot to do with technique


so are you saying articulate sounds use a lot of gain, or just that you can add on lots of gain before it becomes muddy?
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

Quote by AsOneIStand
Head and Cab for $130? You don't need a head and cabinet, you need a psychological examination.
#6
Quote by Meatball200
I've considered it to be how well it pronounces notes which is also due to how dynamic it is, quite a hard term to nail down though.

+1. This is a really good explanation.
#7
What I'd like to know is what does it mean if an amp is "tight" or not?
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#8
Quote by nbroers
What I'd like to know is what does it mean if an amp is "tight" or not?

when the bass is not flabby and everything sounds, well, tight

tight generally also means not muddy.


in a way, it's related to 'articulate'.
#9
Quote by nbroers
What I'd like to know is what does it mean if an amp is "tight" or not?


i guess its a bit more of a metal thing, but when you hit a palm muted powerchord on a very loose amp, something very saturated, the palm mutes dont have that sharp definition that they would have if you were using an ENGL or something
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

Quote by AsOneIStand
Head and Cab for $130? You don't need a head and cabinet, you need a psychological examination.
#10
Hmm isn't this then a characteristic of the speaker? I mean, if the speaker doesn't handle lower frequencies well, then it will struggle to produce the mids and trebble properly while producing the bass. And surely more mids = better articulation?
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#11
Articulate, to me, means the amp has clarity and definition. When you play a fast run, an articulate amp will translate every note and nuance of your playing into what the audience hears.

The opposite of this would be, for example, imagine you've cranked up the gain too high on a high-gain amp, you've cranked the bass up, and you play kind of sloppily. You get a really unarticulate, 'loose' sound.
Last edited by Mitchell? at Jan 27, 2009,
#12
Quote by Mitchell?
Articulate, to me, means the amp has clarity and definition. When you play a fast run, an articulate amp will translate every note and nuance of your playing into what the audience hears.

The opposite of this would be, for example, imagine you've cranked up the gain too high on a high-gain amp, you've cranked the bass up, and you play kind of sloppily. You get a really unarticulate, 'loose' sound.


This is a pretty good explanation. An articulate amp will transfer every little thing you do to the strings to the speakers ( & yes, good (or at least decent) speakers are a MUST). Articulation doesn't necessarily have to be high-gain. Examples of amps with extraordinary & outstanding articulation would be as follows IMO:
low-mid gain: Divided By 13
mid-gain: Mojave Amp Works
high-gain: Soldano SLO 100

The down side of a very articulate amp, though, is that every little tiny mistake or flaw in your technique is magnified. You can't hide behind the wall of distortion or a bunch of FX, because the amp will expose you. That's just the way they are.
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