#1
I've heard that all bends are supposed to move the string as far as twice the distance between two strings. Do all bends use exactly this distance, or does it vary, e.g. are there bends that go only half that distance?

Second question is about tremolo arms/whammy bars. Can these be attached to any guitar, and what do you need to do in order to attach them?
#2
the distance is irrelevant - you bend the string however far you need to for it to reach the correct pitch.
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#3
ok, is there any system behind how the distance varies, e.g. the same for all frets and varying over strings, or the same for all strings but varying over frets, or is there no practical memorable system at all? Just wondering if the distance has to be memorized for each tone/target pitch pair?
Last edited by narciso_yepes at Jan 27, 2009,
#4
No, you have to use your ears.
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#5
Just try to listen for the pitch your trying to reach. Example:

e--13b15

On the high e string (1st string), you'd play the 13 fret, then bend it so it sounds like the 15th. Sometimes it would just be sometimes like 13 to 14. I've even seen something like 13 to 16. Just try to listen for the pitch your trying to reach.
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#6
Use your ears. Usually bends are only whole and half steps, and when you bend don't just bend for the sake of it, think of what note you want to reach when you bend
#8
basically for fast bends I can use my ears first time, but later times when I replay the piece, or say if I were to do it on a stage, I'd have to remember the distance, especially for a very fast bend because there isn't enough time to hand-ear coordinate it, or?
#9
Quote by Baby Joel
Just try to listen for the pitch your trying to reach. Example:

e--13b15

On the high e string (1st string), you'd play the 13 fret, then bend it so it sounds like the 15th. Sometimes it would just be sometimes like 13 to 14. I've even seen something like 13 to 16. Just try to listen for the pitch your trying to reach.

I can bend 1 to 8.
No seriously though, I can bend 2 and a half steps MAX.
And like everyone said, you have to use your ear.
For the trem bar, if your guitar has a hole for it, just plug it in. And considering you barely know how to bend, I'd stay away from it.
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#10
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I can bend 1 to 8.
No seriously though, I can bend 2 and a half steps MAX.
And like everyone said, you have to use your ear.
For the trem bar, if your guitar has a hole for it, just plug it in. And considering you barely know how to bend, I'd stay away from it.

well i can bend decently but it hurts in the finger tips when i try the more difficult types of bends or trying to simulate uber-fast tremolo arm shaking like bending action with standard bends... and especially for faster bends, to me it seems like a tremolo arm would give better precision control.

anyway, if there's no hole (like on my guitar), what to do then? Buy a new guitar? where is the hole typically located btw? on the actual tailpiece, or just below it (or somewhere else)?
Last edited by narciso_yepes at Jan 27, 2009,
#11
Quote by narciso_yepes
well i can bend decently but it hurts in the finger tips when i try the more difficult types of bends or trying to simulate uber-fast tremolo arm shaking like bending action with standard bends... and especially for faster bends, to me it seems like a tremolo arm would give better precision control.

anyway, if there's no hole (like on my guitar), what to do then? Buy a new guitar? where is the hole typically located btw? on the actual tailpiece, or just below it (or somewhere else)?

Then you don't have a tremolo bridge.
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#12
Quote by steven seagull
Then you don't have a tremolo bridge.

Yep I figured... so do I need a new guitar or is it possible to just replace the bridge with one that does have tremolo arm support?
#13
It is possible to replace the bridge but you'd have to cut a jaggy great hole in your guitar to do it, and fit it in exactly the right position... plus a decent tremolo bridge won't be cheap...Its not just a case of getting a bridge with a place to put the arm, you need a bridge that is designed to work as a tremolo, as it needs to be able to move to shorten/lengthen the strings to change the note's pitch. I wouldn't bother if I were you. Just live without it until you really decide you need a trem, and then buy a guitar with one already fitted.

BTW, when you're practicing bending, it helps to play the note you are bending to first, so you know what your reference is - so say you're going to bend a C to a D, fret and play the D first, then play the C and bend it up to the D while you can still remember how it sounds, then fret the D again to check
#14
The tremolo bridge is on a set of screws along the edge that allows the leverage to move the bridge, bending the strings. So no
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#16
the amount of distance you cover with bending depends on the interval you're bending and the position of the neck.

lets say you want to bend 2 frets, a 3b5 will have a different bend distance than 18b20, even if they're the same interval.
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#17
For half step bends, play the note you want to bend then play one fret above it, now go back to the note you want to bend and bend it to that note.

For whole step bends, play the note you want to bend then go up two frets, back to the note you want to bend and bend to that note.

For 1 1/2 step bends, play the note you want to bend then go up 3 frets,


Bending the B note half a step would be a C note.
1 1/2 steps for a D note.
2 1/2 steps for a E note.

2 1/2 is probably the highest bend you'll ever do.
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