#1
A BBC2 (UK) programme entitled Terry Pratchett: Living With Alzheimer's will be broadcast in January 2009, exact dates to be confirmed, as part of the BBC Headroom series that examines mental health and wellbeing.
Bestselling author, Terry Pratchett, is 60 years old and has recently been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease - but he's not going to take it lying down. He wants Alzheimer's to be sorry that it ever caught him.
Having sold almost 60 million books worldwide, Terry is a man whose imagination is in constant overdrive. The prospect of living without memories or words frightens him.

"I used to be a high speed touch typist. I laughed in the face of the spell checker. But then one day last year, it all started to go wrong."

The first film begins in early 2008 soon after Terry's diagnosis. As he battles with tying his tie and struggles to cope at a public reading of his new book, he explicitly discusses his anger at being diagnosed with an illness for which there remains no cure. The film follows Terry as he tackles the disease head on, tries out some alternative treatments, and confronts leading scientists about how close they are to 'the secret cure, bubbling in a cauldron.'

Surprised by how subtle the effects and symptoms of the disease actually are, Terry meets other people who share the same rare diagnosis as him, each at various stages along this 'dark and unknowing path.' He visits his specialist for tests, using mini mental state examinations to determine the severity of his condition and which parts of his brain are being affected the most. His PA, Rob is probed to reveal more about Terry than Terry might know himself - after all 'this is the disease that hides itself even from the person who has it.'

In the second film, Terry contemplates his future and the difficulty of facing the inevitable 'end game.' Terry travels across the pond to learn, first hand, how Americans are dealing with the 'tsunami of Alzheimer's' that is threatening their health care to find out if they are closer to beating the disease.

"If you're diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's, you feel as though you're standing on a beach and the tide has gone out and so has everybody else. There's no one there."

In LA, Terry meets the unlikely doctor who has recently come across a controversial new Alzheimer's treatment which he claims produces remarkable results in minutes, and in New York State he meets one of the leading experts in PCA (Posterior Cortical Atrophy), Terry's variant form of the illness.

He confronts his probable future by visiting a care home devoted to residents with dementia, whilst evaluating the difficult dilemma thousands of carers are faced with when dealing with a loved one who can't look after themselves.

Passionately determined to 'name the demon' and rid patients of the shame and stigma attached to this illness, Terry's desire is to find a treatment, if not a cure, which will allow him to carry on writing for as long as possible - he doesn't have any time to waste


They'll be shown on the 4th and 9th of February.
#3
I met him once at a book signing. I really love his books. Poor guy.
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#6
shame that such good minds go to waste. but what about the nameless regular people with such conditions?
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#7
He'll get better, I saw an article in the paper of some new type of treatment he's trying. It's like a crazy helmet he's putting on it's supposed to help him.

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#8
Quote by filthandfury
I swear I saw this before.

Me too, I think it might have just been a news report on it about 6 months ago though.


Poor bloke, I read a few of his books when I was younger.
#9
my grandmother has alzheimer's. it's a pretty depressing disease. she's at the state where she's basically a small child. on rare occasions, she'll recognize someone, but she's still incapable of forming sentences. last time i saw her, she thought i was her long dead son.
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#10
Sigh, I realy hope he will get better. He's my favorite writer! Discworld FTW!
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#12
Awww this is one thing I'd gonna watch on TV.
I was reading in the newspaper, with an interview with pratchett that everyday he finds he has to relearn to type when it comes to writing. that's so sad, especially for an author I like so much.
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#13
Quote by faint_spirit
my grandmother has alzheimer's. it's a pretty depressing disease. she's at the state where she's basically a small child. on rare occasions, she'll recognize someone, but she's still incapable of forming sentences. last time i saw her, she thought i was her long dead son.


My grandmother has to as well, not quite that bad but...
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#14
Quote by SlipknotRule93
shame that such good minds go to waste. but what about the nameless regular people with such conditions?


My grandmother has it.

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