#1
If you're playing a "major triad arpeggio starting with the 7th" what intervals would you play?
R, 5, 7?
R, 3, 7?
Also would that be a major 7th or a minor 7th?
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Last edited by LeperAffinity at Jan 27, 2009,
#2
Quote by LeperAffinity
If you're playing a "major triad arpeggio starting with the 7th" what intervals would you play?
R, 5, 7?
R, 3, 7?
Also would that be a major 7th or a minor 7th?



if your playing a 7th, it's no longer a triad. it's a "7th" arpeggio.
(triad = 3 notes..... 1 3 5)


R 3 5 7 = Major 7th arpeggio (regardless of starting note)
#3
That's what I thought but I've been told to play a "minor triad, starting with the root note, and then a major triad starting with the 7th, and then another major triad starting with the major 3rd."
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables
#4
Quote by LeperAffinity
That's what I thought but I've been told to play a "minor triad, starting with the root note, and then a major triad starting with the 7th, and then another major triad starting with the major 3rd."

It might (it's very unclear) mean that you should play the seventh as the lowest note which would be the third inversion of the chord.

So if you had a C7 chord then it would be played with the Bb as the lowest note (then the others can be in any order). However, the quote you've given does not make it clear whether it should be a b7 or 7.

The same would aply to the last instruction, except the third would be the lowest note making it the first inversion of the chord.

I'm just guessing though because that is ridculously unclear.
#5
Getting scale degrees confused I reckon. You're doing arpeggios in a minor key. You want to do a minor triad on the i, then a major triad on the VII , then a major triad on the III. I dunno what key you're doing, but as an example say A minor:
First chord A, C, E
Second G, B, D
Third C, E, G

That must be what's intended I think
#6
Yeah what Sam Vines said.

A triad doesn't have the seventh so I wouldn't think it's an inversion though that is a valid interpretation and may turn out to be right - who knows.

I would have thought they meant play a minor triad using the tonic as the root. Then play a major triad using the subtonic as the root (7th degree of the scale is the root for the major triad). And finally play a major triad using the mediant as the root (3rd degree of the scale is the root).
Si
#7
Thanks guys that seems to be what was meant, it sounds right anyway, first arpeggio was a C minor, then Bb major, then Eb major.
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables