#1
Do i go about learning Full scales?
For example, the C Major scale (because the tutors at college say that learning that will answer alot of my questions).
What i mean when i say "go about learning", i mean do i break them up into parts? if so, how do i do that?
Is there a website that has them already broken up to make it easier?
etc.
Help appreciated.
(im using the scale as shown on http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php
ive got "FULL, C and Major" selected. Tuning: Standard, Vertical patterns.
Also, what are "horizontal 4/3 notes per string" and "Shifted v1/2" and where/when would i use them?

Sorry for all the questions.
#2
modes.
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#3
That's just a whole bunch of different places on the neck you can play the same scale. Learn the notes of the scale.

You just need to learn the different positions of scales really.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Jan 27, 2009,
#7
i do believe the sticky has examples!

college?? what do you mean by tutors? are you a music major? j/w
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#8
Quote by Ninjake
modes.


no

TS - learn the notes and intervals of a scale, then locate them on the fretboard, if you don't know where the notes are on the fretboard then you'll need to learn those first.
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#9
I know alot of the notes on the fretboard.
What are intervals? ive heard them mentioned, could someone jog my memory?
To 20Tigers: That post is helpful. The caged system looks like what i was looking for. Are there "caged" examples for other scales? Or for the major scales in a different key?
#11
I think u should learn the major and minor pentatonics FIRSt, because the major scale, and the minor scale is just the pentatonics with some added notes in them if u took a look closely, same goes to all the diatonic modes (exept locrian because hes gay lol)
#13
by the way, u asked on how to learn full scales, i m guessing what u meant was to memorize them on the fretboard, if so, learn pentatonics first, then the full scale, as the pentatonics is more practical, and it just makes it easier to memorize because its basically the major scale "broken up"
#14
The way I would suggest is to first learn all the notes on the fretboard. If you are willing to put some work into this (I recommend learning standard notation and practising playing from that ) and can keep the knowledge (by regularly playing from standard notation, for example) then it shouldn't take too long.

After this all you will have to do is learn what seven notes are in each scale to be able to play them anywhere on the neck. Simples.
#15
Quote by 12345abcd3
The way I would suggest is to first learn all the notes on the fretboard. If you are willing to put some work into this (I recommend learning standard notation and practising playing from that ) and can keep the knowledge (by regularly playing from standard notation, for example) then it shouldn't take too long.

After this all you will have to do is learn what seven notes are in each scale to be able to play them anywhere on the neck. Simples.


+1
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#16
i know ive got to learn the major scale, i just dont know where to break it up so i can learn it easier.
#18
You own a Prestige Ibanez and can't play a C Major Scale???


How I went about doing it was learning all 12 major scales within the first 5 frets. Not nessecarily octave to octave, but the Low E (or F/E# for keys that don't have an E) to the A on 5th fret of high e (or G#/Ab according to scale.)

After learning them, they all fit together like jigsaw pieces, as moving up a C major scale 2 frets, it is now D major! Also try learning the notes of the fretboard. You don't have to be obsessive and be able to recall any note within 0.5 seconds, but a decent understanding of the neck helps.
#19
Quote by Grevious555
i know ive got to learn the major scale, i just dont know where to break it up so i can learn it easier.

You don't need to break anything up - you need to learn the notes of the fretboard so you can locate your scale on the fretboard.
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#20
Quote by steven seagull
You don't need to break anything up - you need to learn the notes of the fretboard so you can locate your scale on the fretboard.

+1

If you learn the notes of the fretboard then you can learn any other type of scale just by learning 7 notes instead of all the patterns again. Also, learning the notes of the fretboard will mean that you are actually aware of what notes you are playing instead of playing random frets in a pattern.
#21
Quote by Grevious555
I know alot of the notes on the fretboard.
What are intervals? ive heard them mentioned, could someone jog my memory?
To 20Tigers: That post is helpful. The caged system looks like what i was looking for. Are there "caged" examples for other scales? Or for the major scales in a different key?


You want to get the Major Scale down cold. Once you really know the major scale and can fly through the whole thing up and down the fretboard you're home and hosed. All you do is play the same positions up or down the fretboard to change key. So if you take pattern 3 from that diagram and shift the whole thing up you two frets you get B major if you shift it up another three frets you get D major etc.

As for the other scales. Get the major scale down and then it's just a matter or altering a note here and there to get the other scales. For example F# natural minor scale is the relative minor of A major. All the patterns will be the same but they have a different root note are used in different contexts and so each note creates a different relationship in A major as it does in F# minor. Then F# harmonic minor is just one note changed from F#m and F# melodic minor is another note changed.

But nevermind that just focus on getting that major scale down solid. It should take you a while. I'm talking ten maybe thirty weeks of daily practice. Play through them in sequences and in intervals as well as straight up and down.

By straight up and down the scale I mean just that in terms of scale degrees and ascending run would be 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 and a descending run 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1.

Practicing in intervals is going through the scale in specific steps sticking to the scale.

If you were doing intervals in 3rds for example you would work through your scale using thirds from each scale degree. You would start with the first scale degree 1 3 would be your first third interval - in the major scale it would be a major 3rd. Then 2 4 would be next - a minor third starting on the second degree. then 3 5 then 4 6 5 7 etc up and down the scale in every position

A sequence is a pattern of notes that repeats up through the scale on a different starting point in scale degrees it might be 1 3 2 3 2 4 3 4 3 5 4 5...etc or it might be more simple 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 5 3 4 5 6 4 5 6 7...etc all the way up and all the way down.

You want to practice lot's of different sequences based on 3 4 and 5 notes.
3 notes = 123 234 345... or 171 212 323 434 545... or 143 254 365... or anything you can come up with.

You might come up with a sequence that follows an sequence for example
1343 3565 4676 3565 2454 4676 5787 4676 ...etc see how it is a sequence in which each note also follows a sequence - in this example the sequences are the same but they don't have to be.

Always play with a metronome and play in quarter notes eighth notes sixteenth notes and do quarter note triplets eighth note triplets sixteenth note triplets. Sometimes accent the last note and sometimes the first note. 671 712

You should just work out some exercises and do one or two per day for ten to fifteen minutes. Focus on one pattern at a time until you have it down. Maybe a week on one pattern but play the same pattern at a different place on the neck from day to day.

Once you have all the patterns and can play through them anyway you want then start putting them together by creating exercises that move from one position to another.

Anyway if you do all that you're ****ing awesome. It's just some ideas to get you going. The point is stick to one pattern at a time but mix up the way you play the pattern. Do it daily and do it to a metronome.

Don't worry about learning lot's of different scales until you have the major scale under your belt. It is the foundation, everything else in music relates back to the major scale in some way.
Si
#22
Quote by Volvic
You own a Prestige Ibanez and can't play a C Major Scale???


How I went about doing it was learning all 12 major scales within the first 5 frets. Not nessecarily octave to octave, but the Low E (or F/E# for keys that don't have an E) to the A on 5th fret of high e (or G#/Ab according to scale.)

After learning them, they all fit together like jigsaw pieces, as moving up a C major scale 2 frets, it is now D major! Also try learning the notes of the fretboard. You don't have to be obsessive and be able to recall any note within 0.5 seconds, but a decent understanding of the neck helps.


I dont quite understand what you mean. do u mean like learn the notes within the first 5 frets then like, play the scales in the first five frets? if so, then i think thats a good idea.

Also, its not like they ask you when you go to buy a guitar if you can play certain scales, lol.
#23
Quote by 12345abcd3
+1

If you learn the notes of the fretboard then you can learn any other type of scale just by learning 7 notes instead of all the patterns again. Also, learning the notes of the fretboard will mean that you are actually aware of what notes you are playing instead of playing random frets in a pattern.



Thankyou.
This seems like a good way to go about it all. i will learn the notes on the fretboard, and learn what notes are in scales.
I know that the notes of the C major scale are the white notes on a keyboard, CDEFGABC. i just need to learn them on the fretboard now.
Cheers
#24
Quote by Grevious555
Thankyou.
This seems like a good way to go about it all. i will learn the notes on the fretboard, and learn what notes are in scales.
I know that the notes of the C major scale are the white notes on a keyboard, CDEFGABC. i just need to learn them on the fretboard now.
Cheers

Glad to have helped.

Learning the fretboard does seem a bit long and tedious but it doesn't have to be (google "fretboard warrior") and once you know playing in key, and so many other things, will be so much easier.