#1
Alright so I'm "restarting to learn guitar".... kinda.

I really didn't start correctly, I didn't take things seriously, and etc... I've had wrong things in my head. I know a bunch of things , even a lot, but I just can't apply it correctly or can't remember things. I've been playing for about a year now (fev 2008) and really don't know a lot of songs. I have to say, I have a pretty developped phrasing for improvising, but I still lack of "licks".

So my question here is : let's say I'm a total begginer, where to start? What should I know? Should I try composing to create licks more easier?

USELESS PARAGRAPH WARNING: My speed isn't really bad, it's actually pretty good, why I am doing this thread is because ... I'll give an example to clarify all this : I've learned seventh arpeggios, but never learnt the NOTES inside them or their degrees and etc. I've been practicing triads seriously for some weeks since I've heard it can help you to improvise with more melody (from what I heard, you must base your playing on the triad/sevent/etc of the rythm chord, when a lot of extensions are used it turns to jazz, but I still know that if it sounds good to you, it's alright, for example; shredders don't only use "triads" in their big crazy licks, they use anything that might sound good. Anyway sorry for this parenthesis, but just to say that I still know about some stuff)

I should have made this thread earlier... I have to go sleep now, I'll check out this thread tomorrow.

Thanks in advance!
#2
INTERVALS.

/thread

if you can understand intervals, what they are, how they apply to music, scales, chords, etc, and how to use them to understand the fretboard, you will be on easy street.

scales are made up of intervals
chords are constructed using intervals from a scale
modes are easily understandable using intervals
intervals help you understand the functions of notes within a key

INTERVALS. learn 'em. click the link in my sig to get started.

If you don't get it, read a different article. Read ten. One of them will stick, and once you understand intervals, everything else will start to fall into place.
#3
Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the Columns section - they're exactly what you need.
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#4
Quote by frigginjerk
INTERVALS.
Hah, now that I think about it, that's probably why 90% of confused musicians post here. They don't understand intervals.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#5
Read Creative guitar: cutting edge techniques by guthrie govan. it explains theory in probably the simplest way possible, i pretty much undrestood modes 3 hours later just the diatonic ones tho, not the plagal (stupid) ones. just do it, if you dont want to do it, you will realize how much of your life you are wasting playing the guitar if u did come accross this book years later. that is all!

And to get licks, all you have to do is know some patterns and play random intervals.

As far as i know, the more u stretch around the fret board, the more interesting and pretty it sounds, as long as not overused. AND ALWAYS trY NEW FKIN THINGS, NEW FKING THINGS ARE ALWAYS GOOD. e.g. improvise over huge intervals, they sound incredibly yummy. and for harmony, make simple 3-5 note random chords, if u ask me,the sh#t on all the six string chords. what i mean by random chords are chords formed out of a choice of intervals which if u usually give a name to them, they will look like Cmj2^fe=mc2,22,johnsontreets,jevola canyon. Make sure they fit in the scale/ key ur using aswell
#6
I already know all theory stuff about intervals. I just need to remember some names and to be able to identify them by hearing.

Quote by dmirtygorachyov
Read Creative guitar: cutting edge techniques by guthrie govan. it explains theory in probably the simplest way possible, i pretty much undrestood modes 3 hours later just the diatonic ones tho, not the plagal (stupid) ones. just do it, if you dont want to do it, you will realize how much of your life you are wasting playing the guitar if u did come accross this book years later. that is all!

And to get licks, all you have to do is know some patterns and play random intervals.

As far as i know, the more u stretch around the fret board, the more interesting and pretty it sounds, as long as not overused. AND ALWAYS trY NEW FKIN THINGS, NEW FKING THINGS ARE ALWAYS GOOD. e.g. improvise over huge intervals, they sound incredibly yummy. and for harmony, make simple 3-5 note random chords, if u ask me,the sh#t on all the six string chords. what i mean by random chords are chords formed out of a choice of intervals which if u usually give a name to them, they will look like Cmj2^fe=mc2,22,johnsontreets,jevola canyon. Make sure they fit in the scale/ key ur using aswell


Actually, that's why I want to try composition. To start to explore chords, chord progressions, and etc.

Anyway thanks everyone. I shouldn't have named this thread like this though.... By reading the interval article, I realized I don't already know a bunch. I already know about modes btw. My problem is that (and composition might fix it) I never really apply theory to my guitar playing. Like, I could read a bunch of theory for example : modes, but I never try applying it and stuff.

Also , I need to learn songs and try to memorize the techniques used and stuff.

Oh yeah, and I passed through the crusade, pretty cool stuff. Once again, I never tried to apply and practice that theory though....
#7
Quote by kevC4
My problem is that (and composition might fix it) I never really apply theory to my guitar playing. Like, I could read a bunch of theory for example : modes, but I never try applying it and stuff.

Also , I need to learn songs and try to memorize the techniques used and stuff.

Oh yeah, and I passed through the crusade, pretty cool stuff. Once again, I never tried to apply and practice that theory though....



one thing I've figured out that really helps me is, whenever I learn something new I try and apply it to guitar, right then. I'll figure it out, play with it, explore all the things I can do with it, really make sure I understand.

Like if I'm reading an article or something, whenever I stumble onto something I didn't know before, I'll stop right there and play with that one little bit of information for a while, and make sure I understand it, before moving on. it helps me a lot, try it.
#8
Quote by kevC4
I already know all theory stuff about intervals. I just need to remember some names and to be able to identify them by hearing. My problem is that (and composition might fix it) I never really apply theory to my guitar playing. Like, I could read a bunch of theory for example : modes, but I never try applying it and stuff.

Also , I need to learn songs and try to memorize the techniques used and stuff.

Oh yeah, and I passed through the crusade, pretty cool stuff. Once again, I never tried to apply and practice that theory though....


here's the problem.... and don't think i'm just trying to be a jerk....

if you have read about theory, but you don't apply it to the guitar, then you don't "know" any theory. it has no practical use for you. You can read about it and not get dizzy, but if you can't pick up your guitar, know where to find any interval from any given root note, or play a scale from memory using it's interval pattern, then you aren't really getting any benefit from your theory knowledge.

if you truly want to "restart" your guitar education, begin at intervals. don't move on until you can find any interval you want, in any direction on the fretboard, from ANY root note. don't move on until this is second nature, ie: when you can find your intervals in less than a couple seconds.

to make it easiest, i recommend that you do the following: memorize the names and positions of EVERY note on the A and low E strings, up to the 12th fret. knowing these notes and their positions, you can find their octaves pretty quick. you should be able to find any octave of any root note, on ANY string, and be able to do it quickly, without consulting a chart. once you know where all the root notes are, you just need to remember how to find any other intervals IN RELATION to where the root note is. this will give you control of the entire fretboard.
#9
Quote by frigginjerk
here's the problem.... and don't think i'm just trying to be a jerk....

if you have read about theory, but you don't apply it to the guitar, then you don't "know" any theory. it has no practical use for you. You can read about it and not get dizzy, but if you can't pick up your guitar, know where to find any interval from any given root note, or play a scale from memory using it's interval pattern, then you aren't really getting any benefit from your theory knowledge.



Or in the words off Elvis Presley;

A little Less conversation, a little more action please.

TS he's right, intervals are THE most important thing, and is basically everything in music. Nothing exists without intervals. This even goes for non-western music like Indian music (raga) and Arabic music and klezmer and all other kinds of exotic music.

I would almost go as far as saying that 'music' is synonym for 'musical intervals'.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 28, 2009,
#10
Quote by frigginjerk
if you have read about theory, but you don't apply it to the guitar, then you don't "know" any theory.
This is true, but your knowledge should transcend merely playing the guitar. You should be able to explain the D major scale and its modes to a piano player, not just apply it on the guitar. It's music theory, not guitar theory.
#11
Mmmm I see... Well thanks everyone, I will work on stuff from now on.

I'm still thinking about something though, should I start composing?? Because with composition, I could apply theory correctly , practice intervals, practice my hearing, applying modes and etc.

Why I'm thinking about composition is because I really don't know how I could practice theory I learn. For example, when I first learn seventh chords and secondary substitution stuff, I was like and I still am like this : "ok well, now that I know this.... uh...*stares at guitar*..... what". I know how to make chords but, I just never practice it or things like that.

Quote by frigginjerk
here's the problem.... and don't think i'm just trying to be a jerk....

if you have read about theory, but you don't apply it to the guitar, then you don't "know" any theory. it has no practical use for you. You can read about it and not get dizzy, but if you can't pick up your guitar, know where to find any interval from any given root note, or play a scale from memory using it's interval pattern, then you aren't really getting any benefit from your theory knowledge.

if you truly want to "restart" your guitar education, begin at intervals. don't move on until you can find any interval you want, in any direction on the fretboard, from ANY root note. don't move on until this is second nature, ie: when you can find your intervals in less than a couple seconds.

to make it easiest, i recommend that you do the following: memorize the names and positions of EVERY note on the A and low E strings, up to the 12th fret. knowing these notes and their positions, you can find their octaves pretty quick. you should be able to find any octave of any root note, on ANY string, and be able to do it quickly, without consulting a chart. once you know where all the root notes are, you just need to remember how to find any other intervals IN RELATION to where the root note is. this will give you control of the entire fretboard.


Yeah I'm actually starting to memorize triads (and the name of the notes inside), then I'll go for diads, and etc. I'll make sure I know every triads and all of every degree of the C major scale, then go on for another scale maybe (that's not too important) , and etc.

Anyway, thanks ppl :P
Last edited by kevC4 at Jan 28, 2009,