#1
One of my new yr resolutions is to learn to play lead guitar. My squier strat has been rotting in my bedroom for about a year now and recently i took it to a guitar tech to get it fixed up. How do i start to learn how to play lead? Any points that can get me started in the right way? I bought a book also "rock guitar for dummies". I'm sure we have all started from scratch before. I do have theory knowledge. A grade 7 in piano. My amp is a roland microcube plus i have a zoom gfx-5. I'm clueless as how to begin.besides following the book which is rather useful, i would like to know how u guys did it. Im not shy from practicing but rather would like to know what to practice. Pentatonic scales in 5 diff positions all over the neck? One of my resoultions is one solid hour of practice before bed. Lol, please enlighten
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#2
Learning the pentatonic shapes is a fantastic way to start learning lead guitar. Also, look at tabs for other solos to see good licks to use and good ways of using the scales.
#3
Quote by Julian2103
A grade 7 in piano.

Work out the notes on the fretboard, then you'll understand a lot more.
Then look on this site for lessons on simple technique, the chromatic exercises are the best in my opinion, for building technique,
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#4
You got grade 7 in music theory, and you don't understand the concept of playing lead over harmony?

Or do you want finger exercises or something?

Or ..?!?

I don't really understand what you want

Like do you wanna learn where the notes are on the neck? Or the conventions of blues/rock solo's?

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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#5
Well, as you know, the piano way of playing accompaniment is vastly different than lead guitar. For instance in the song I'm feeling you which feat. Carlos Santana, he doesnt exactly play fills or licks the way a piano player would play the accompaniment. How do you develop the feel of improvising licks such as that? Or you just see ppl taking up guitars and randomly jamming out bluesy or rock esque kinda solos. That's exactly what I would like to know. Thx guys for the quick replies
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#6
playing guitar is like playing the piano, except if u play fast u just "appear" more skilled, but srzly, its like piano but its harder to remmeber every note on the fretboard, if u can remember every note on the fretboard and make intervals in under -1 seconds, ur set (bearing in mind in additon to the 7th grade piano theory : ))))
#7
Ya but even if i know all the notes, my fills will just sound very piano-ey. You know wat i mean?
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#8
I think you're asking how people can just pick up a guitar and start jamming over a backing track in key. Learn what the notes on the fretboard are, at least on the low E and A strings, then learn all the scales you can. Of course, you need to know how to apply these scales to certain chord progressions.
#9
Oh,and then how would i know how to apply them? To create the blues or rock kinda sound. Lol, i guess my one hour is gonna be filled with scales memorising.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#10
TS

I know exactly what you mean.

Sonic quality.

Piano licks on guitar don't match up (to the person saying that). Play a metal riff on a piano and people will fall asleep I can guarantee you that.

TO TS

Learn about the quality of a guitar. It's different then a piano, in that you are in direct contact with the sound, where with a piano it's indirect contact.

Learn blues solo's, but I dunno, I can only explain this in real life, cause it has to do with how you pick and where you pick and timing and all little things.

Hmmmmm *thinks harder*

I suggest start learning with techniques like vibrato and legato and picking in general, cause these play an important role. Once you have an understanding of this, you will begin to see different phrasing (like slides and hammer's on and bends etc.)

The signature of FREEPOWER contains technique lessons + video examples. (he's moderator here's so ur bound to find 1 of his posts)

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#11
i think i get what your saying, listen, listen, listen to alot of guitar players, get their sounds embedded into your brain, you mentioned santanna, listen to him, but really listen, after your done with your one hour of practicing, put on a pair of headphones while your falling asleep and listen, and pay attention to the sounds your hearing. once your done with that go out and learn the song

Learnthe pentatonic shapes on your guitar first and fool around with those, after that feel free to expand and learn the shapes of major scales, minor scales, and all the modes, and learn how to apply them. how do you do that? listen to musicians you like and try to identify how the artists uses these scales.

and listen to XXdarrennXX, freepower has great lessons
#12
Ah..ic. Do you guys think my squier strat is a suitable starter guitar? Or maybe I should go get another one.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#13
Plus i think my guitar has fret buzz. Prob need to adjust the truss rod. But im not sure how to do it myself and there isnt a guitar tech nearby. I thought the problem had been fixed by the previous one but it seems to hv warped again
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#14
Quote by Julian2103
Ah..ic. Do you guys think my squier strat is a suitable starter guitar? Or maybe I should go get another one.


Unless there is something wrong with it physically, any guitar is fine.

If you want to play lead (I assume improvise), start with the blues. period.
The reasons are:

1) It's the easiest to start sounding semi-good with.
2) It's easiest to play with minimal theory knowledge.
3) It's consistent. Almost always it's the same 3 chords, in the same order.
4) Rock & Jazz are firmly rooted in blues. Understanding playing blues, helps everything.
5) Playing it well is subtle. As your theory and ear develop you'll always find new places to explore with it.
6) Blues will inevitably come up in any jam or tryout.
7) It's really something you should know in your sleep even if you don't care for it that much.
#15
Ya, Ive memorised the pentatonic scales all over the neck. The 5 positions. Im aware that blues scale is just adding a note or two. Probably the licks would come to me as i practice. Got my hands on another book. Rock Guitar Secrets by Paul Fischer. Was astounded to find out that the contents of the books reminded me just of my theory lessons. Lol, but it's really a good book. Would recommend it to anyone.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC
#16
I'm pretty good on piano, but I can't improvise on it. I suck (relatively speaking) on guitar, but I can improvise. It's a different ball game really.

As above, start with blues. Listen to some B.B. King and get some backing tracks for the same songs (his version of "The Thrill Is Gone" is ideal; there's nothing but the regular Blues scale throughout). Take turns between listening to the originals and playing along to the backing tracks. You're wanting to work out the licks he uses, but not in a formal note-for-note way. You want to be able to come up with the lick yourself and think "Oh, so that's how he does it". It's not about trying to play difficult stuff, it's about trying to make easy stuff - stuff you're comfortable with playing - sound good. Everything is easy if you come up with it by yourself. It fits into your own little system and you so you understand it better.
#17
All right. My church member today gave me his yamaha pacifica strat. Should be better than my squier. Lol.Alrite, blues it is then. The difficult part is the muting part. For instance when im playing the scales, I have to figure out how to mute and play at the same time. That's tough
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR 08' edition
Zoom Gfx-5
Roland Microcube
Laney HCM15 Hardcore Max
Takamine G Series EG341SC