#1
What do you think of this.


Scalloped

+

Dimarzio DP217 in bridge

+

Dimarzio DP184 Chopper


Good enough for neoclassical? or somethings missing?
#2
Quote by Knuxus



Good enough for neoclassical? or somethings missing?


Wood, I suppose.
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#3
Quote by Knuxus
What do you think of this.


Scalloped

+

Dimarzio DP217 in bridge

+

Dimarzio DP184 Chopper


Good enough for neoclassical? or somethings missing?


It doesn't matter if it's scalloped, anyway go try it out. If it feels good and sounds good then its fine. Any guitar thats properly setup is fine for neoclassical.


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#4
floyd? not 2 much into shred but floyd would be nice i assume? but malmsteen didnt need 1 .. mm i dunno. go fender, itll last u
#5
All that matter's is that you like the guitar enough to pick it up each day and play, if that mean's scalloping the fret's for extra comfort then do it, but dont do it just becuase you've heard it's good, just try doing a light scallop, enough so you notice, but not to much as to cause hindurance to your playing, also i'm i cant critique the pick ups i've never heard of them, but with neo-classical you want to be able to excel at clean's, a good amp would help with this alot!

If you already own the squier and you love the feel of it, then go for it and customize it, dont listen to people who say buy a fender, high end guitars arent the be all, end all of musical instruments, its about what you feel comfortable and happy with.
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#6
Thanks for the opinion, yes i love that type of white in the guitar, and i know its harder to play with scallops, but its that vibrato and bendings which are really impressive, although i didnt understand what valdean meant...
#7
Quote by jimithrash
floyd? not 2 much into shred but floyd would be nice i assume? but malmsteen didnt need 1 .. mm i dunno. go fender, itll last u


If it was me I'd be tempted to buy a licenced floyd and put it on not-floating, Youknow, so you can only downbend with it? a good compramise in terms of price, tuning stability and functionality i think.
#8
Before too much squier hate comes in with no backing, I'll ask, is it standard series or affinity series?
Affinity = Alder wood, meaning the same wood as Malmsteen, Blackmore, well any of your strat using neo-classical guys would have.
Standard = Agathis wood, people usually slander this to death, for no reason mostly, it gets labeled as plywood too, though it isn't it IS a solid wood, but I find it deals best in high gain situations, but not as good when playing cleans.

Anyway, other than the possible wood issue, I'd go ahead with this idea, hell even if the wood is agathis I'd suggest maybe using slightly cheaper (GFS if you're in america, good, cheap pickups) pickups but still go through with the idea.

EDIT: I forgot to mention, about the floyd rose idea, if you do anything I'd suggest sticking a (decent) Liscensed floyd rose in there, but don't allow floating, so it acts as a slightly more stable strat trem.
However, there's not much point in this unless of course you have the locking nut, which may need an entire new neck, if you want to use a trem the best option would be to get a roller (or maybe graphite) nut and some good quality (possibly locking) tuners, the bridge itself doesn't add much towards tuning stability.
Last edited by Punk_Ninja at Jan 28, 2009,
#9
Quote by Punk_Ninja
Before too much squier hate comes in with no backing, I'll ask, is it standard series or affinity series?
Affinity = Alder wood, meaning the same wood as Malmsteen, Blackmore, well any of your strat using neo-classical guys would have.
Standard = Agathis wood, people usually slander this to death, for no reason mostly, it gets labeled as plywood too, though it isn't it IS a solid wood, but I find it deals best in high gain situations, but not as good when playing cleans.

Anyway, other than the possible wood issue, I'd go ahead with this idea, hell even if the wood is agathis I'd suggest maybe using slightly cheaper (GFS if you're in america, good, cheap pickups) pickups but still go through with the idea.

EDIT: I forgot to mention, about the floyd rose idea, if you do anything I'd suggest sticking a (decent) Liscensed floyd rose in there, but don't allow floating, so it acts as a slightly more stable strat trem.
However, there's not much point in this unless of course you have the locking nut, which may need an entire new neck, if you want to use a trem the best option would be to get a roller (or maybe graphite) nut and some good quality (possibly locking) tuners, the bridge itself doesn't add much towards tuning stability.


I agree - but I didn't know you could only fit locking nuts on certain types of neck I know they used to (still do i think...) make ones that bolt though the neck, but I know you can get them without it - Plus if it's suier won't it be fender-sized?

...maybe not if it's an affinity...
#10
The locking nut needs room on the fretboard.
On any guitar with a regular nut there's a few mm off to fit a locking nut, I've measured up as i had a similar idea a while back.
The nut I think you're on about may be a locking pre-nut, which are pretty hard to find nowadays, made by Kahler I believe, if you can get hold of one of these, then the Floyd Rose idea can still go on.

And Fender sized doesn't mean that a lockin' nut will fit on, the Affinity or the standard series are pretty much the same (but the standard has lesser wood and better hardware, where the affinity has better wood and lesser hardware) either won't fit a locking nut without a fair bit of hassle (while fitting and possibly while playing if the nut goes into the fretboard too much).
#11
Quote by Knuxus
Thanks for the opinion, yes i love that type of white in the guitar, and i know its harder to play with scallops, but its that vibrato and bendings which are really impressive, although i didnt understand what valdean meant...



NO!!

Good Lord the misconceptions about scalloped fingerboards floating around on this forum are enough to drive a man out of his mind. No offense to you Knuxus I know it's probably not your fault, but rather some other ignoramus who told you so, but either way, listen up:

Scalloped fingerboards are easier to play, by a good bit, than a standard fretboard in every single category of technique. I'm going to re-post something I wrote about a week ago on here in a thread similar to this one:

Quote by Lumberjack
Scalloped fret boards are God's gift to guitarists. They are amazing. I've scalloped 4 necks to date, and I have never regretted a single one, and frankly wish all my necks were scalloped.

I did mine with a 1/8" rasp, files, and sandpaper, and it takes about 7 hours to get it really done right, but it's worth it. The expressive control on a scalloped fingerboard for playing lead is truly unparalleled: since your fingers never touch the wood, you expend less energy as none of your sliding, fretting, or chording energy goes into the fingerboard, it goes straight to the string. This provides a direct transfer of energy which means you only have to use a very little bit to fret, leaving your hand looser, freer, and much better able to play faster and more ergonomically whether it be rhythm or lead.

It makes difficult barre chords, odd add 2nd or 9th or 11th chords and open string stretches near the nut easier, and don't get me started on playing lead on the things. Ok you got me started.


Since your fingers are uninhibited by the friction of touching the wood, your vibrato frees up incredibly well, and lets you really tear into a more expressive level of musicality on bent notes, and especially regularly fretted vibrato. Also, considering the fact that the amount of energy it costs to depress the strings for an effective contact with the fret is so drastically lowered, hammer ons, pull offs, tapping, and all legato playing in general becomes WAY more fluid and effortless. As for regular alternate, economy, or string skipping picking, you can run up scales and lead lines much faster since you don't have to invest as much time depressing strings on your way up/down the neck.


I'm not exaggerating at all, the improvement is shocking, just play one for 4-5 hours and you'll see what I mean. However, if you are not an experience guitarist, you might not even notice the difference. My friends have played the guitars I've scalloped, who are not that good at the guitar, and they won't notice much of a difference. But for someone who is familiarly experienced with the fretboard, the difference will be like night and day.



And also this:

Quote by lbj273
so is scalloping more for metal guitarists than say blues or jazz?
Quote by Lumberjack
No, this is a common misconception due to the fact that metal and rock guitarists are the people who brought scalloped fingerboards into the spotlight, e.g., Yngwie Malmsteen and Richie Blackmoore to name a couple.

A scalloped fingerboard is for any guitar player who appreciates decreased expenditure of energy, ergonomic excellence, and an overall easier playing experience in addition to increased expressive control over your instrument.

Check out this guy, he plays a bunch of blues and stuff on a Yngwie Malmsteen signature guitar, and is a perfect example of the fact that a scalloped fingerboard is a solid choice for any kind of playing style:

Click here dudes.



Seriously man. I would suggest trying a scalloped board before you do it to your own, as just because scalloped board do "this or that" doesn't mean they are for everyone. They take a smidge of getting used to, but after about 5-6 hours, you really start to reap the benefits.


Maybe I should make an ULTIMATE Scalloped Fingerboards thread or something so these issue won't keep popping up.....


......hmm.....
#13
Quote by Punk_Ninja
The locking nut needs room on the fretboard.
On any guitar with a regular nut there's a few mm off to fit a locking nut, I've measured up as i had a similar idea a while back.
The nut I think you're on about may be a locking pre-nut, which are pretty hard to find nowadays, made by Kahler I believe, if you can get hold of one of these, then the Floyd Rose idea can still go on.

And Fender sized doesn't mean that a lockin' nut will fit on, the Affinity or the standard series are pretty much the same (but the standard has lesser wood and better hardware, where the affinity has better wood and lesser hardware) either won't fit a locking nut without a fair bit of hassle (while fitting and possibly while playing if the nut goes into the fretboard too much).


oh aye, of course,

haha, on my dad's affinity strat the low E machine head is so close to the nut it's sitting on the fillet just before it. but it looks from that photo like there's enough space, no?
Last edited by jimRH7 at Jan 28, 2009,
#14
Well, a locking pre-nut should fit on most guitars, however you need a flat surface for an actual locking nut, so room behind the nut isn't compatible.
#15
I have to agree with the posts about scalloping... I just a few days ago scalloped a crappy strat copy... and for the first time ever, I've been playing that more than my fender.
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#16
you like malmsteen huh?
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#17
there is a way to fix a locking nut on a fender-style neck, If I'm feeling artsy I'll try and draw up a picture to show you.
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#18
You could try to get a super-V nut. Its a locking trem made to drop right in to strtas but they cost $200 is I dont think youd pay that much for a trem to put on a squire, but if you can find the nut on ebay that would be better than working it for a floyd one.

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#19
Are there any places that you can get a guitar scalloped? I have a squier with the same description that I've considered customizing.
#20
Quote by Dio10101
Are there any places that you can get a guitar scalloped? I have a squier with the same description that I've considered customizing.



It's really not difficult to do yourself, and I HIGHLY doubt you would be able to find a guitar tech who would be willing to try it. Even if you did, I could easily see a scalloping job costing in excess of $120 for labor, whereas you could by a round file and some sandpaper for $20 and do it yourself.


That's that, I'm going to make a thread on scalloping. I'll get one together either tonight or tomorrow.
#21
Quote by lumberjack
It's really not difficult to do yourself, and I HIGHLY doubt you would be able to find a guitar tech who would be willing to try it. Even if you did, I could easily see a scalloping job costing in excess of $120 for labor, whereas you could by a round file and some sandpaper for $20 and do it yourself.


That's that, I'm going to make a thread on scalloping. I'll get one together either tonight or tomorrow.

I would really like to see this, I've scalloped the lower frets on 24-fret guitars, but I've never done a full scallop and I'd really like to learn how to do so.
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#22
Quote by Edwardthegreat5
I would really like to see this, I've scalloped the lower frets on 24-fret guitars, but I've never done a full scallop and I'd really like to learn how to do so.



Will do. Probably tomorrow though, I'm about to head to bed!
#23
Quote by lumberjack
Will do. Probably tomorrow though, I'm about to head to bed!

You ever get this done, brohan?
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#24
Quote by Edwardthegreat5
You ever get this done, brohan?



Dang, sorry guys, I forgot to pull stuff together for it. I'm out for a few hours, but I'll be back this afternoon and I should have some time to write up a solid thread before the super bowl starts. Not that I care about any of the teams in it...
#25
i eagerly await the thread. im seriously considering scalloping a squier strat and throwing lace alumitones into it. i play a lot of chords but three reasons i am not afraid to scallop

1.i know i am going to continue increasing my string gauge, and have heard that barre chords are just fine if you are using heavier strings

2. truss rods are there so the dang neck wont warp.

3.i have seen more trustworthy advice from lumberjack, and he actually does builds as opposed to just speculating

4.i know that there are a lot of people saying you will bend your chords out of tune on scallops.. however it is clear that this just requires practice and a sensitive ear and touch. of course its different it takes getting used to.

5. the overall tone, expression, and ease of vibrato and bends is just too sick to ignore.

my point is that scalloping is not something to be afraid of, nor is it just a shred thing.
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#27
Quote by Punk_Ninja
The locking nut needs room on the fretboard.
On any guitar with a regular nut there's a few mm off to fit a locking nut, I've measured up as i had a similar idea a while back.
The nut I think you're on about may be a locking pre-nut, which are pretty hard to find nowadays, made by Kahler I believe, if you can get hold of one of these, then the Floyd Rose idea can still go on.

And Fender sized doesn't mean that a lockin' nut will fit on, the Affinity or the standard series are pretty much the same (but the standard has lesser wood and better hardware, where the affinity has better wood and lesser hardware) either won't fit a locking nut without a fair bit of hassle (while fitting and possibly while playing if the nut goes into the fretboard too much).


http://www.kahlerparts.com/Other_Pages/Stringlocks.htm