#1
OK for the past 6 months I have been reviewing my technique. I started playing classical guitar and have tried to move over as many technique from that too my steel string & electric playing. Mainly keeping my thumb in the middle of the neck and keeping my fingers curled when they fret and stuff like that. The improvement has been amazing and I can't believe how I use to play. But my intrest now has moved back to the steel string acoustic and with that I like to use plectrum which obviously the strict classical guides don't provide any instruction on. So far what I do is I keep my wrist planted near the bridge and make sure that the plectrum at right angles to the string. My question mainly comes with my wrist. Should I stop planting my wrist and keep it floating? Do people play fast like that? If not is there a specific place I should keep planted?

I'm not looking for the standard do whatever is comfortable or whatever sounds good answer. I want the if you do it this way you'll never have any trouble answer.
Ben Pazolli
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#3
your question sort of counteracts its self with the last sentance.

truth is, there is no 100% correct way.

simply, dont think about it, and play. THAT is the correct positioning for you.

then go into detail, ie. are you tensing any muscles when you play (which you shouldnt), you should play all freely etc.

if you do not tense, with practice, this "technique" will be yours, and will be limitless in terms of speed, and endurance (assuming you practice)

- you shouldnt be thinking about pick degrees to strings, as that comes down to tone, paul gilbert runs his pick almost parallel, and gives him his unique sound. (also note, gilbert is one of the worlds cleanest/quickest shredders.)

so in that respect, dont worry too much about it, it comes down to again, tensing and comfort.
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#4
yep hale is right.! but for me.. i usually anchor my pinky and my ring finger.. but when i found out that it has a downfall in the long term.. i really tried my best not to anchor my fingers anymore.. it feels very awkward.. i got used to it about 2 days.. but its still yours to what ever you want to do..
#5
The best way is the most comfortable way.

I usually anchor my pinky and ring fingers, and people are always telling me not to, thats its improper technique, but I don't care.
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Last edited by [x]Huffy[x] at Jan 29, 2009,
#6
Quote by bpazolli
OK for the past 6 months I have been reviewing my technique. I started playing classical guitar and have tried to move over as many technique from that too my steel string & electric playing. Mainly keeping my thumb in the middle of the neck and keeping my fingers curled when they fret and stuff like that. The improvement has been amazing and I can't believe how I use to play. But my intrest now has moved back to the steel string acoustic and with that I like to use plectrum which obviously the strict classical guides don't provide any instruction on. So far what I do is I keep my wrist planted near the bridge and make sure that the plectrum at right angles to the string. My question mainly comes with my wrist. Should I stop planting my wrist and keep it floating? Do people play fast like that? If not is there a specific place I should keep planted?

I'm not looking for the standard do whatever is comfortable or whatever sounds good answer. I want the if you do it this way you'll never have any trouble answer.

One of the main things you're going to have to get used to is the fact that other styles of playing aren't quite as strict as classical.
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#8
There is no "right" way to play guitar. There are bad ways though. Planting your wrist can be bad. It can lead to digging into the guitar, using more muscle than needed, and general tendonitis/repetitive stress injury inducing problems. This is anchoring. It is not good. If you plant it lightly and never dig in, it's not bad. It's not really good either, IMO. You lose some range in picking, as well as dynamics. I would try to avoid it. If you don't want to avoid it, pay very close attention to your body. You want your body to be relaxed and free.
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#9
I've been playing pure fingerstyle for a long time, and only recently started using plectrums - gives a great speed boost for power chords and tremolo picking. I too would like some advice on plectrum position. "What feels best" is no doubt best in the long run, but whenever you try something new it's good to hear what others, who have been experimenting for a while arrived at. It's better to start off with something decent , than something absolutely crazy and have to start over many more times.
#10
as i said, you wont have to start over if its working, comfortable, and your not tensing any muscles.

go on you tube and suss out some peoples techniques.
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#11
Quote by bpazolli
I'm not looking for the standard do whatever is comfortable or whatever sounds good answer. I want the if you do it this way you'll never have any trouble answer.

You're asking for an answer you already know. I still can't decide whether or not I prefer clamshell (fingers in) or rooster (fingers out) picking. If you're comfortably holding the pick, you're doing it the right way and you will never have problems with it.
#12
I like using the shoulder of the plectrum instead of the pointed end. Takes a little getting used to since you have to get your hand closer to the strings. Less plastic there to get passed so you can go a little faster and a broader area to pick with so if the pick starts slipping sideways or something its no big deal.