#1
If I have a ball and cut of a small piece of the ball, how do I count the volume of the removed piece ?
Is there a formula for this ?


PS. If there's a specific maths thread, nicely give me a link and I will gladly remove this thread and post in the correct place instead.
#5
you'd be better of not cutting stuff off your balls anyway


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#8
hm... I'm sure it has something to do with the radius and hight of the sphere piece, not too sure exactly how though. let me think a minute..
#9
I don't know about the mathematical formula, but one way to get the volume of an irregular solid is to fill an overflow can up just to the spout and place a graduated cylinder underneath it. Then drop in the irregular solid and count the volume of the water displaced is the volume of the irregular solid.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#10
Crank the balls volume to 11, cut off a piece of it and see what the volume is. Then you take that volume and subtract it from the original 11 and see what you have. There is your answer on what volume your ball is.

<.<;
People are bastards. Bastardcoated bastards with bastardfilling.
#12
Quote by Ur all $h1t
I don't know about the mathematical formula, but one way to get the volume of an irregular solid is to fill an overflow can up just to the spout and place a graduated cylinder underneath it. Then drop in the irregular solid and count the volume of the water displaced is the volume of the irregular solid.


but I don't think you always bring that stuff to an exam don't you ?


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