#1
I sing in a band, and for the past couple of months I've been borrowing a microphone from the owner's of our rehearsal space. I've decided that I need to buy my own, but I don't want to end up with one that isn't very good.

I'm looking for one that is around £100 new, so that maybe I can get a good deal on ebay or something. Does anyone have any suggestions?
#3
Although 58's are marketed as vocal mics and 57's are marketed as instrument mics, I really prefer the 57 over the 58 for vocals.

Better than either of those, IMHO, is the Sennheiser e835, which sells for the same price, give or take a few bucks.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Quote by axemanchris
Although 58's are marketed as vocal mics and 57's are marketed as instrument mics, I really prefer the 57 over the 58 for vocals.

Better than either of those, IMHO, is the Sennheiser e835, which sells for the same price, give or take a few bucks.

CT


Yeah, if you've got a deeper voice, an SM57 might mysteriously sound better on your vocals. At least that's the case with me.

But I'd recommend saving up more for a large-diaphragm condenser mic.
#5
... not for live, though. *shudder*

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
The SM57 lets you get a little closer to the diaphram, which gives a bit better low end response, but you lose the wind screen protection of te SM58. They have a tight pattern, which helps in loud situations. Also, every soundman in the world knows what to expect with 57's or 58's. In the studio, you might try anything, but for live gigs, buy a 58 and don't look back. The industry standard since WWII...
#8
Quote by axemanchris
Although 58's are marketed as vocal mics and 57's are marketed as instrument mics, I really prefer the 57 over the 58 for vocals.

Better than either of those, IMHO, is the Sennheiser e835, which sells for the same price, give or take a few bucks.

CT



I do sometimes agree with this actually, only in certain situations. But I'd still opt for the 58, as it's more durable for live use. 57 is durable, but you can really kick the fuck out of a 58.
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#9
From a little reading I found that the the reason an SM57 is good for deep vocals is because it doesn't have the grill that the SM58 has so you can get closer to the diaphragm giving you a bass boost.

They are basically the same mic though.
#10
57's are just as durable.

However.... when I show up to a gig and ask the soundman about using my own mic for lead vocals, I am always asked... "I don't know. What is it?" When I tell them it is a Sennheiser e835, the answer is always, "Oh yeah, that'll be fine."

After singing through the 835 and then singing through the 58, the 58 always sounds like singing through wet moving blankets in comparison.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by maggot9779
you can get closer to the diaphragm giving you a bass boost.



It's called the "proximity effect" if anyone cares.
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#13
I would try and stretch that a little and go for a rode NT1 which runs $230. I am not sure of the conversion rate nowadays though so it might be more than what I thought.
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#14
Get an SM-58, if you end up wanting an SM57 sound get a different windscreen, since that's the only real difference between the two anyway.
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#15
Hold on. Is this for live or studio use?
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#16
ahhh yeah I didn't realize that I think it's for live use. SM 58 would be my two cents
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#17
Quote by willieturnip
Hold on. Is this for live or studio use?


Live. I saw the Shure Beta 58A on ebay and one went for £80 and its better than the SM series i think. Does anyone have any experience with this mic?
#18
The beta series have more top end sparkle in general.

I like the Beta 57A on female vocals. It sounds superb with norah jones/katie melua type voices.

I don't have any experience with the 58A, though I have heard nothing particularly great about them.

The SM58 has more low end response and I find are generally better for male vocals than the beta series.

The SM57 is more raw and "grainy" than the SM58 and can have even more low end offered because you can get closer to the diaphragm and invoke the proximity effect more.
Epiphone Elitist SG (Serious)
Tokai Silver Star
Epiphone Dot
Epiphone Les Paul
Washburn J28SCEDL
Washburn J12S

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JCM600 (Yes a 600..)
#20
Good point about the polar pattern. If your singer moves around the stage, the 845 is certainly the better choice. There is also a 935/945 series, but I can't remember the difference between them and the 835/845 ones.

Since I sing and play guitar, all I need to do is get the sound dialed in for the mic, and it's good for the night because it just stays there. The wider polar pattern is better for that, too, because singing and playing at the same time doesn't always allow you to be precisely on axis to the mic all the time. So, it's more forgiving.

Based on that, I really never even worry about feedback.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.