#1
According to guitar pro (yes, the lazy man's teacher) you can bend straight or come back down from the bend. What is the difference, and how do I achieve this? I just learned to bend a desired semitone without over/underbending, so I'd really like to know how to get the most out of the bend.
#2
its called a pre bend. it takes a lot of feel for the instrument. when you do it you bend up to the "starting note" before you sound the note with your picking hand and after its picked you release the bend to the fretted strings original note. its very hard to get good intonation when you cant hear the note beforehand. when bending up a half step (or more) your hand-ear coordination will assist you bending up to the desired note without sharping it but when prebending you have to just guess at the note judging by feel and not sound. if youre a beginner or even a decent intermediate its probably not the first thing you should focus on extensively but experimenting never hurts as long as youre still working on your standard technique development enough.
#3
hooray for the lazy man's teacher.
Gear:
Peavey Millennium 4 BXP
Peavey TNT 115
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Blackstar Ht-1R
#4
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
its called a pre bend. it takes a lot of feel for the instrument. when you do it you bend up to the "starting note" before you sound the note with your picking hand and after its picked you release the bend to the fretted strings original note. its very hard to get good intonation when you cant hear the note beforehand. when bending up a half step (or more) your hand-ear coordination will assist you bending up to the desired note without sharping it but when prebending you have to just guess at the note judging by feel and not sound. if youre a beginner or even a decent intermediate its probably not the first thing you should focus on extensively but experimenting never hurts as long as youre still working on your standard technique development enough.


Thanks. I'm trying to learn as many things that have to do with training my ear. I've never been taught to listen for notes and I've started more and more to anticipate notes, hear wrong notes, and even guess at which notes would work well next. I was really inspired by Maggot Brain, the way he managed to use only 1 scale to such amazing effect.
#5
There's some standard blues licks that bend both ways. Try this for instance:


e|------------
B|-----8------
G|-7b9===9b7~-
D|------------
A|------------
E|------------


which is often shortened to:


e|--------
B|-8------
G|---9b7~-
D|--------
A|--------
E|--------


As said, for the second one you'll need to know where to bend to without hearing it. You can try those two back to back to get the right feel for it.

I quite like prebending to the flat 5th in the blues scale. Something like:


e|------------------
B|------------------
G|-8b7-8b7-8b7-5h7~-
D|------------------
A|------------------
E|------------------


where the third bend is let down really slowly.
#6
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
its called a pre bend. it takes a lot of feel for the instrument. when you do it you bend up to the "starting note" before you sound the note with your picking hand and after its picked you release the bend to the fretted strings original note. its very hard to get good intonation when you cant hear the note beforehand. when bending up a half step (or more) your hand-ear coordination will assist you bending up to the desired note without sharping it but when prebending you have to just guess at the note judging by feel and not sound. if youre a beginner or even a decent intermediate its probably not the first thing you should focus on extensively but experimenting never hurts as long as youre still working on your standard technique development enough.


awesome answer to sum everything up. Listen to this guy.....for now. but yes, pre-bending is probably NOT what a beginner should be focusing on. But if you do use it, make sure you have your normal bends down first. Like getting good intonation, not sounding other strings, getting the right pitch (not sharp or flat), then go pre-bends