#1
I know the low e and high e and i see the pattern it has on the other strings. Is there is any free things like fret board road maps. I want to understand it. Im sooo close.


Also whats the best way to train my ears. I can tell when i hit a bad notes sounds HORRIBLE
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
Last edited by silly6-string at Jan 30, 2009,
#3
Quote by M Power
Learning where all the octaves lie for each string will help



say 5th string a to a and 4th string a to a u mean?
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#5
Just play the notes down the fretboard and say the note that you are playing out loud.
Don't try to purely memorize, remembering through practice and repetition is actually better.
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#6
Quote by silly6-string
say 5th string a to a and 4th string a to a u mean?

No, those have the same pitch. He meant like a 6th string A (5th fret) to a 4th string A (7th fret), for example.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
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#7
Quote by silly6-string
I know the low e and high e and i see the pattern it has on the other strings. Is there is any free things like fret board road maps. I want to understand it. Im sooo close.


Also whats the best way to train my ears. I can tell when i hit a bad notes sounds HORRIBLE


Do you want to memorize the strings or the notes of the fretboard? Sounds to me like it's the strings you are talking about from your question. Those will be:
EADGBe. A good way to mem. those will be to remember the following: Even Apples Do Go Bad Eventually, or Eddie Ate Dynamite, Good Bye Eddie.
Now, if it's the notes of the fretboard you're trying to memorize, then search for and download a little program called "Fretboard Warrior". It's free and is a game that you play to help you learn your way around the fretboard. It has sound and visual ques to help you learn as you go.
#8
Quote by Froboarder
No, those have the same pitch. He meant like a 6th string A (5th fret) to a 4th string A (7th fret), for example.



Isnt a to a on the same string a octave? I thought 8 notes is the octaive. g a b c d e f# g the last g is the octave of the first g. right?
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#9
Quote by silly6-string
Isnt a to a on the same string a octave? I thought 8 notes is the octaive. g a b c d e f# g the last g is the octave of the first g. right?

That is correct, but the way you described it before was the same note, same pitch, different string.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#11
Learning to sight read standard notation is a great way to learn the notes plus you gain a bonus skill for your arsenal. Good luck!
#13
I'm doing this at the minute, i've never bothered and it really holds you back.

I find taking each note separately helps me. Find the 'A' all over the fretboard. Memorise it. Then do B,C,D,E,F,G. I've been doing it since last monday and i'm up to F. If you point to any fret where A,B,C,D or E lie i can tell you instantly what it is. Then all you have to do is learn the accidentals. Also try downloading the circle of fifths, playing the 2-octave major scale starting on different notes of the low e, and actually say the notes whilst playing them. (The circle of fifths is so you can read the notes in each key as you play, don't mean to be patronising, just incase you didn't know what it is).

PS, i've found it helps me hear what the notes sound like as well.
Last edited by Ikonoklast at Jan 30, 2009,
#14
I found a great way to find most notes by only memorizing the 5th and 6th string notes using octaves. Example. 3rd fret 6th string is G, so skip over the 5th string to the 4th and skip up 2 frets, gues what? your on G again! This works for the 5th and 6th strings. to the 3rd and for the 2nd string the pattern is backwards to the 5th string, and of course the 1st and 6th string notes are the same.
See the attached image.
The notes marked R are the Root notes!
Enjoy!
Attachments:
Octaves.gif
My anger managment class is really starting to piss me off!!
Last edited by showey at Jan 31, 2009,
#15
I think it's more helpful to remember how the notes sound than to merely remember box shapes/patterns.
#16
Aye, true but people learn to reach their goals in different ways. If someone
can use this to help them reach their goals (as I did) then it's all good right?
My anger managment class is really starting to piss me off!!
#17
Visualize. And Repetition. I know every note on the neck now but it took a couple months while studying all the time.
#18
Quote by Froboarder
That is correct, but the way you described it before was the same note, same pitch, different string.

I think what he meant was open 5th string A to 12th fret A on the A string, and the 7th fret A on the D string to the 19th fret A on the D string, which would be octaves. It wasn't what M Power meant, but they're still octaves. By the way, your post implies that octaves are different notes, which they aren't.
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#19
I have recently thought about a simple way:
1. Take a pen and paper and draw a clock face with numbers.
2. Starting at 12 o'clock and working clockwise, add the 6th string notes, i.e. E=12, G=3, B=7, D=10 etc

It should look like the attachment.

Next you can ask one of two question types:
1. What note is the 7th fret on the B string:
A: Start from B and count 7 positions clockwise to F#/Gb

2. I want to find C# on the G string:
A: Start at C#/Dd (9 o'clock) and count anti-clockwise to the string (G, or 3 o'clock) = 6, i.e 6th fret on the G string is C#

If you know the E string, and know what a clock looks like, you can easily remember this. By practicing partial cords based on strings 1-4 with roots on string 4, 3, and 2, you'll cover most of the fretboard and the notes will start sinking in.

What is more, this technique applies to any similar stringed instrument and any tuning.
Hope it's useful.
Attachments:
Fretboard Learning.jpg
Last edited by W_Somerset at Dec 10, 2009,
#20
Google Fretboard Warrior - its a pretty cool free programme where it plays a note on a fretboard and you name it.

And learn to find intervals - unisons, octaves, 3rds and 5ths especially.
#21
I think the optimal way (most bang for your buck) is to learn to sight-read because it has so many additional benefits, but a lot of people don't have a stomach for it. I think eventually you want to be able to know where all the notes are cold, without having to think much about it or make mathmatical calculations or comparisons to other strings. People who have been playing for a while can usually do it on the E string due to playing barre chords. Some know E & A and open position. That's where I was for a long time, until I decided to learn all the notes. What I did was go through the circle of 5ths and find each note everywhere on the guitar. I'd spend maybe 5 minutes a day doing it and it probably took a month to remember all the notes. Since then I've incorporated sight-reading into my practice, which has really reinforced the notes.
#22
somehting I do is take a metronome, put it a decent slow pace, 70-80BPM and go through the circle of 5ths, playing each note in every string so I start playing C on every string, one C per beat, then go to G on every string, keep it on the beat and keep it consistant. Then I do the same cycle of 5ths but I go through th whole cycle on 1 string at a time, helps a ton and take 5-10 mins out of your daily practice!

(I hadn't read jsepguitar's post, I now realize they're both really smiliar :P)
Last edited by revoh at Dec 10, 2009,
#23
Quote by revoh
somehting I do is take a metronome, put it a decent slow pace, 70-80BPM and go through the circle of 5ths, playing each note in every string so I start playing C on every string, one C per beat, then go to G on every string, keep it on the beat and keep it consistant. Then I do the same cycle of 5ths but I go through th whole cycle on 1 string at a time, helps a ton and take 5-10 mins out of your daily practice!

(I hadn't read jsepguitar's post, I now realize they're both really smiliar :P)


I got the idea from Satriani. He wrote about it in a magazine article back in '87 and it's included in his Guitar Secrets book.
#24
I have just started to learn the fretboard and i printed off a blank fret board then wrote the notes in. The way i found the easiest was to remember that on the fret board b and e are as i call them are "single notes" all the others are "double notes" . This prob isn`t the correct name or method used but it was just something i noticed and i can now remember what goes where.
#25
Here's the simple way I learned. I went from knowing nothing but the C scale on frets 1-3 to the entire fretboard in one day.

Once you learn all the natural notes on the first 3 frets of each string you simple repeat the pattern a couple frets up on the string above it. For instance the natural fifth string notes are 0-2-3 (ABC). Now drop back down to the E-string, those same notes are on frets 5-7-8 in the same exact interval. Now just repeat that box pattern for the rest of the strings ...

String 4: 0-2-3 (DEF)
String 5: 5-7-8 (DEF)

And so on ... for the 3rd (G) string you sort of break the pattern and drop down to fret 4 that way you forget to learn any whole notes on your way up the board. Then it's a simple matter of memorizing the last two notes found on 10 and 12, and that's it. Everything after twelve is of course a repeating octave.