#1
Well I noticed this problem a couple of days ago but I disregarded it thinking my fingers were worn out. But I plugged in yesterday and tried bending my G string (yea) with a tuner plugged in. I tried bending on the 9th fret and it could only get up to F. I tried pushing up really hard still just getting F. I’m getting my intonations checked out at my local guitar shop today but is their anything else they could check out that would be the source of the problem. The neck is also a little bit bent would that affect it?
Thanks Again
BT
#2
the neck being bent probably would have an impact on that, but yea your best bet would be to go get it checked out. also, it could be a fret problem although that doesnt seem likely, or something with the action of the strings
#3
the neck should be fixed, then IMHO.
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2
#4
either the radius of the neck is off or you're playing with a high gauge string and its hard to bend
Gibson Les Paul Classic
Orange Tiny Terror with 1x12 cab
Big Muff
Vox Clyge McCoy Wah Pedel
Holy Grail Reverb
#5
So does the string hit against the next fret or is it just to stiff to bend that much.
#6
Dude somtimes tuners can be out, especially if they're the plug in ones, and not the ones that work off vibration. If it sounds like you've bent it perfectly in pitch that's all that matters.
#7
I can hear the difference. It doesn't sound like its changing to a higher pitch. No matter how high i bend it just stays the same note.
#8
unless the note dies out, as a result of the string not being able to vibrate freely during the bend it is not a neck issue. This is a common problem with necks with too much relief and is an easy fix. IF however you are able to get the string to sound when youre bendign you must be using some totally whacked strings. Put a set of d'adario or EBs on for starters. Different string material reacts differently to stretches, and some will change pitch faster than others. Say you are bending the string half an inch upwards one type of string might go up a whole note, where another might have jumped a whole quint. I use d'adario xl's or plain steels as those to me have the perfect "pitch changing ratio" :P
Guitars:
Gibson L. P std. 2006
Gibson L. P studio
Höfner asj228
Main amp:
Marshall 2061x HW head
Marshall 2061cx cab
fx:
Stock BD-2
TU-2
verbzilla
C.M. Red repeat
T-rex F.T.
Practice:
Epi vjr head
2x12 V30 cab and 4x10 G10 cab
#9
Hmm... one question, do you have a floyd rose bridge? If so, it's possible that if there's not quite enough tention on your trem springs as you bend the string up it actually pulls your bridge down and counteracts the raise in pitch. Maybe get your guitar shop guys to check that out while they're at it.
#10
Quote by Waylanderau
Hmm... one question, do you have a floyd rose bridge? If so, it's possible that if there's not quite enough tention on your trem springs as you bend the string up it actually pulls your bridge down and counteracts the raise in pitch. Maybe get your guitar shop guys to check that out while they're at it.


Wow, didnt even think of that sounds very probable
Guitars:
Gibson L. P std. 2006
Gibson L. P studio
Höfner asj228
Main amp:
Marshall 2061x HW head
Marshall 2061cx cab
fx:
Stock BD-2
TU-2
verbzilla
C.M. Red repeat
T-rex F.T.
Practice:
Epi vjr head
2x12 V30 cab and 4x10 G10 cab
#11
I remember coming across a few guitars with the same problem when I was working as a tech a few years ago, guys would set them up with as little tention as possible so the bridge was actually sitting up on an angle and they could manipulate the wammy easier and get more range when they pulled up on the bar.