#1
pretty much topic, but like why does a V7 sound so good to a root?

and also, what resolves to an augmented chord? and a mixed thirds chord?
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#2
Every minor or major chord has a dominant chord.

Making that dominant chord a "7" gives it instability, and therefore makes it want to resolve to that chord.

Augmented chords as far as I know resolve into their respective major chords. Ie Caug - Cmajor.

Suspended chords resolve into major or minor, but can be mixed.

Sus2 - minor
Sus4 - major

But like I said, can be mixed.

Hope that helps.
#3
Quote by one vision
Every minor or major chord has a dominant chord.

Making that dominant chord a "7" gives it instability, and therefore makes it want to resolve to that chord.

Augmented chords as far as I know resolve into their respective major chords. Ie Caug - Cmajor.

Suspended chords resolve into major or minor, but can be mixed.

Sus2 - minor
Sus4 - major

But like I said, can be mixed.

Hope that helps.


Augmented chords are more likely to function as an altered V, so, for example C aug would resolve a fifth down to F major or minor.


Because of the symmetry, though, that means an augmented chord could potentially resolve to three different places when used this way. For instance, C augmented has the same notes as E and G# augmented.


The question, however, was "what resolves to an augmented chord"... if it's functioning as V, you could precede it with a predominant, like ii or IV, or perhaps a secondary dominant. There are plenty of other options and uses for it, though.
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#4
Alrighty, listen closely, I've written on this topic considerably;


Every minor or major chord has a diminished chord. Making a chord diminished chord gives it instability, and therefore makes it want to resolve to its ''central devolution''. Augmented chords resolve into their respective major chords. Ie Caug - Cmajor.

Keep trucking kiddo
#5
thanks for the quick responses. but my question for the augmented chord is im kinda writing a piece with a part in harmonic major (third mode of harmonic minor) and i have an ok chord progression going on, but i need a good ol fashioned cadence to end it. so what do i do? or should i just go major for the last coupla bars. its kinda wierd in that theres no perfect fifth.

EDIT: i guess my title was pretty vague, i wanna know how to end a piece on any chord kinda thing, so i want to know what to have precede it.
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Last edited by Ribcage at Jan 30, 2009,
#6
Obviously as there is no perfect fifth, your best bet is gonna be return to the major for a few bars to cadence it out a bit.
#7
That's a tremendously extensive subject. I strongly suggest buying good textbook on harmony.
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#8
yeah i guess. thanks guys. to my local library!
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#9
Quote by Ribcage
pretty much topic, but like why does a V7 sound so good to a root?
Voice leading.

A long long time ago, back when the leaders in music theory were monks, some monks found that a single lined melody (back then, music was just a sung melody, no chords) resolved (finished) best when a melody moved diatonically (no outof scale notes) stepwise (either 1 or 2 semitones).

So E D C would resolve a melody in C major. So would A B C.

After a while, monks wanted to make their music more interesting and have two different melodies going at once, counterpoint. This gave rise to "chords," as chords can be seen as a number of melodies. They found out that this sounded best if as many melodies as possible moved in different directions, so if one melody was getting higher the other should get lower. They also found out that each melody needed to resolve (so each needed to move stepwise) to the tonal center or a perfect fifth of the tonal center (as this is very consonant and resolves most dissonance).

Combine these three facts together and you get a cadences and chords. Both B and D move stepwise to C and they both move against each other. We also add a G, as this stabilises the B and D, making a happy major chord instead of an unstable vii0 chord.
An F can also be added, as F moves stepwise to the G or the E in the C major chord.

So in the second last chord of a C major progression, we have G B D F. This makes a G7 chord.
Quote by Ribcage
and also, what resolves to an augmented chord? and a mixed thirds chord?
Nothing resolves to an augmented chord. Resolution means the instability of dissonance has been stabilised and the song (in a listeners mind) can end. Augmented chords are naturally dissonant chords, due to the fact augmented chords have an augmented interval. By rule of thumb, augmented intervals are usually dissonant.

That being said, a number of jazz composers would sometimes substitute a dominant chord (say G7 in a Cmajor progression) for an augmented chord. So G7 - Cmaj could be substituted as G+7 - Cmaj.
Also, I've heard augmented chords built on a flattened third degree can be used predominant chords. So thats III+ - V - I or Caug - E - A in A major. This sort of works, but there are better predominants.
Quote by Ribcage

thanks for the quick responses. but my question for the augmented chord is im kinda writing a piece with a part in harmonic major (third mode of harmonic minor) and i have an ok chord progression going on, but i need a good ol fashioned cadence to end it. so what do i do?
Uh-huh, right

That's not really going to work.

First off, you don't usually write a whole song in the harmonic minor scale. The harmonic minor scale came about because people found out that minor melodies resolved better with a raised seventh (as in the harmonic minor scale) than with a flattened seventh (as in the natural minor scale). Most composers would only raise the seventh note (making a harmonic minor scale) when they want to resolve. Otherwise, you're better of using the more stable natural minor scale.

Like I said before, you can't resolve to an augmented chord. It's too dissonant, thus contradicting the meaning of a musical "resolve." It's like writing a stable modal progression in the locrian mode. You just can't do it.

Also, you don't write songs in modes. It's archaic. See this post for the reason why: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1051887&page=4 scroll down and find my post.


If you want to get the sound of the harmonic major scale (I'm guessing you just like the spicyness of the m6th in major tonality), write a standard major progression and write a major melody. Except, instead of using a major sixth (A in the C major scale), flatten your sixth and use a minor sixth instead (Ab in the Cmajor scale).

You might also have to flatten the seventh too, if you plan on moving (melody wise) from the sixth note to the seventh note. So say you wanted your melody to go G, Ab, B, C. I'd recommend you flatten the B so the melody goes G, Ab, Bb, C. This avoids a melodic augmented second intervals which is very dissonant and unsingable (another rule of thumb, if you can't sing it your melody won't be catchy).
Keeping in mind you probably shouldn't do this when you resolve, as a flattened seventh doesn't resolve nearly as well as a natural (or raised seventh in minor) seventh.
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#10
^^ Demon is right;

Although I won't say "don't use modes if you play rock"

It's exactly "breaking" and expanding the rules in music which leads to innovators.

Music overall is already getting worse, please don't encourage people

It's the same as saying, Harmonic minor doesn't belong in metal!!

See how big the impact was when they DID start using it. I'm not a big fan myself, but you can't deny the fact how much of an influence it has.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 31, 2009,