#1
I can create most major scales and minor scales on my piano from scratch. same with chords scales with extensions. can some one point my in the right direction to how to do this on my guitar. im not really sure what im asking cause im kind of clueless..


I know theory i just can't apply it to my guitar yet
#2
search for scales!

Example:
Em and additional notes between (...)


e|-12-(14)-15)-|
B|-12-(13)-15--|
G|-12-14------|
D|-12-14-(16)-|
A|-12-14-(15)-|
E|-12-(14)-15-|


I was too lazy to put the notes seperate so

The ones withtout (...) is just Em-scale but with those notes its E-Aeolian or Natural Harminonic-scale...
#3
Quote by MaXiMuse
search for scales!

Example:
Em and additional notes between (...)


e|-12-(14)-15)-|
B|-12-(13)-15--|
G|-12-14------|
D|-12-14-(16)-|
A|-12-14-(15)-|
E|-12-(14)-15-|


I was too lazy to put the notes seperate so

The ones withtout (...) is just Em-scale but with those notes its E-Aeolian or Natural Harminonic-scale...


what you posted is an Em pentatonic scale. Em and E Aeolian are the same thing. Natural Minor (not natural harmonic) is another word for Aeolian.

TS:
Just apply your knowledge of intervals to the frets. Each fret is 1/2 step. Each string is a perfect fourth apart (except g to b is a major third). With this knowledge (and knowing your chord/barre shape), you can construct anything you could imagine.
#4
The cool thing about guitar, is that everything is pattern based. Once you know how to do a scale, chord, or arpeggio, you just have to understand that moving that particular pattern to a different fret, puts you in a different key. The only thing that changes is the location.
Research the CAGED system. These are chords, scales, and arpeggios based on the open C, A, G, E, and D chords. They're easy to learn. And you've only got 5 patterns to contend with.
There's my way and the wrong way.