#3
No, Its really just adding a thicker gauge but then you do have to go get a set up.
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#4
Are you planning to install 11s or 12s on it?

If you use phosphor bronze strings, you won't get any sound, since they're non-magnetic.
#5
well then i got another problem,

when i tune my high E string and then play the 12th fret it registers closer to a low D. I have to do a big bend to get it up to an E.
It starts going out of tune around the 3rd fret.

the B string also acts similar.
Last edited by 0ut0f0rder at Jan 30, 2009,
#6
Yeah, that's called intonation. Whenever you change string gauge, you need to do a setup on your guitar. This involves setting the action and adjusting the intonation. If you do too drastic of a gauge change, then you may need to have the nut recut.
#7
I tried raising and lowering the string and adjusting the length of the string but nothing helped
Last edited by 0ut0f0rder at Jan 30, 2009,
#8
You'll either have to live with it, or
Go back to the gauge the guitar was designed for, or
Have the guitar setup with a new nut, most likely one that is compensated for the new gauge. It may even require major modification to the guitar to make it work.

What gauge did you install?
#10
Well, that may be part of the problem. Old strings stretch, which can knock out your intonation. That's why you typically change strings before doing a setup on a guitar. I suspect it may also have a lot to do with the string's thickness.