#1
whenever im in the process of learning a song i hear another song and have to learn that song. and while im learning that song the same thing happens. so basically i eventually forget how to play that song after a while because im learning like 10 songs at once. any ideas how i can quit doing this?
#2
Yes: learn to focus.

I used to have the same trouble as you, but I learned to first choose a song I really wanted to learn how to play, and then after that it's a matter of self-discipline in continuing to learn that song.

If you hear another song that you're interested in learning, write down the song's name (and the artist if it's not a familiar song), and just remind yourself of what it is your working on in the present, and that that other song will be what you will work on in the future.
#3
Discipline? Pick a song you like that isn't so difficult that you think you're going to have trouble learning quickly (say a month or two, even if it's just mainly rhythm) and make sure you work through it all properly. Have it so that you could play it to someone and be ok with the performance. If you have any ideas for other songs you want to learn while you're working through it start a list, or pick one lick/riff (like the intro) to learn while you're fine tuning the first one, just don't completely drop the first song - that's your priority.

I used to have this problem too, eventually I just accepted that I'm not going to be able to play all the songs I like at once, if at all, and started working at them one at a time. I picked one and worked on it, then when I was done I picked the next one. Sometimes it was just one lick or riff in a song I really liked so I learned that and was happy not to know the whole thing.

Good luck!
#4
I bounce from song to song to song. As much as it sucks not to focus on just one song, playing multiple songs during your early stages of learning guitar, I feel has accellerated my learning! Why? Because one song might have a cool riff with hammer on's and pull-off's. Then, another song might have a fingerpicking intro. Another song might have a lot of slides and string bends. So, you get to learn all aspects of guitar. In fact, I learned to barre earlier than I should have and i'm so thankful for that! If I had followed my guitar book chapter by chapter I probably would still not be on barre chords and possibly given up when I had to learn them. Another advantage of bouncing from song to song to song is that you are always playing what YOU want to play. Your interest in learning guitar is peaked all the time. It keeps you going.

So, it really works both ways... in my opinion.
#5
if you want to just find good song sections for a specific skill you're learning. that's ok. howver, if you actually want to learn a song, slap yourself in the face or something if you get distracted, idk lol.
my band used to do the same thing when we started, but we just kicked ourselves in the butt. we'll yell at each other if we get distracted lol. we still do it sometimes, but not as much.
#6
And I thought I was the only one with A.D.D. I have to have at least 8 different songs at any one time that I'm trying to learn.
#7
Quote by krazybartender
I bounce from song to song to song. As much as it sucks not to focus on just one song, playing multiple songs during your early stages of learning guitar, I feel has accellerated my learning! Why? Because one song might have a cool riff with hammer on's and pull-off's. Then, another song might have a fingerpicking intro. Another song might have a lot of slides and string bends. So, you get to learn all aspects of guitar. In fact, I learned to barre earlier than I should have and i'm so thankful for that! If I had followed my guitar book chapter by chapter I probably would still not be on barre chords and possibly given up when I had to learn them. Another advantage of bouncing from song to song to song is that you are always playing what YOU want to play. Your interest in learning guitar is peaked all the time. It keeps you going.

So, it really works both ways... in my opinion.


I agree and disagree. I played for a year like this and then got discouraged because I felt as if I had gotten nowhere. For me playing 'bits of 100 of my favourite songs did not teach me much. It exposed me to a lot of playing concepts on the guitar, which was good in a way, but I could not play any of them well. When I got bored or when it got diffficult or when I got distracted I moved on, ultimately I've found the only way to really improve, apart from not just learning songs but focussing on learning specific skills on guitar, was to buckle down and learn a song from start to finish properly.
#8
Usually I watch music videos while im playing guitar, but usually im practicing stuff that I already have memorized when I do that.
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#9
Quote by firesprite
I agree and disagree. I played for a year like this and then got discouraged because I felt as if I had gotten nowhere. For me playing 'bits of 100 of my favourite songs did not teach me much. It exposed me to a lot of playing concepts on the guitar, which was good in a way, but I could not play any of them well. When I got bored or when it got diffficult or when I got distracted I moved on, ultimately I've found the only way to really improve, apart from not just learning songs but focussing on learning specific skills on guitar, was to buckle down and learn a song from start to finish properly.


Yes, I agree... after a certain point enough is enough and learn a damn song from start to finish already. Especially if you ever expect to play for people.