#1
when you stop wanting to learn songs and/or there are none you want to learn and you just want to learn alot of defferent techniques...

because i think i am at that point...atleast until i find a song that i want to learn....

anyway what are some cruital techniques i should learn?? (i want some good techniques for all type of guitar like blues metal classic rock)...and dont just say the basic ones like bend and stuff i mean some good stuff to learn...


oh and music theory is cofusing the hell out of me i just want to know stuff like if i play say G-D-C what key do i play in...like when the chord changes do you change keys or do you stay in g...if that makes sense...anyway help is apreciated
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Quote by Prophet of Page
I don't recommend passive pickups for any kind of blues tone. Ideally, you'd want a passive pickup with a reasonably low level of output.
Last edited by eahilder at Jan 30, 2009,
#2
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html As for techniques, I would recommend just practicing your basics within the constraints of a theoretical nature.
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#3
Quote by Froboarder
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html As for techniques, I would recommend just practicing your basics within the constraints of a theoretical nature.



I just had a look at that......that looks so confusing
#4
Quote by Guitar_Obsessed
I just had a look at that......that looks so confusing



It is at first, but once youve read it a few times and put the information in the theory lessons here on UG together you start having epiphonies all the time about the connections between chords/scales/modes/keys and all that good stuff. Least i know i did that, made me feel pretty smart.

As for technique palm muting, alternate/economy picking, tapping (its a good thing to learn and even the simple stuff is hella impressive), depending on how long youve been at playing guitar you could try sweep picking and all that good stuff.

See youtube or ask google for what you need, they know where it is.
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#5
If you've run out of songs to learn then put bluntly you shouldn't really be playing the guitar. You should be playing the guitar because you love music and more importantly love the instrument, not because of a couple of bands or one genre. If you're not prepared to widen your own musical horizons in order to help your development then there's no point posting here asking for help. The fact that you have a desire to play that instrument should be all the reason you need for going out and finding new stuff to listen to.

I've been playing 18 years and from the moment I first picked the thing up I've never been short of something to learn - the problem is there's too much stuff I want to be able to play and I doubt I'll ever learn it all.
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#6
Quote by steven seagull
If you've run out of songs to learn then put bluntly you shouldn't really be playing the guitar. You should be playing the guitar because you love music and more importantly love the instrument, not because of a couple of bands or one genre. If you're not prepared to widen your own musical horizons in order to help your development then there's no point posting here asking for help. The fact that you have a desire to play that instrument should be all the reason you need for going out and finding new stuff to listen to.

I've been playing 18 years and from the moment I first picked the thing up I've never been short of something to learn - the problem is there's too much stuff I want to be able to play and I doubt I'll ever learn it all.


Same; I actually stopped learning songs, because once I Worked my way through some progressive shred song of 8 minutes long, I realise I have 10000000000000000000000000000 songs to go that I potentially like

I only learn songs that I think can benefit my technique or that I just find plain fun.

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#7
The only time I can understand somebody stopping consciously making the effort to learn songs is when they get to the point where they can pretty much figure anything out by ear on the spot, or if they're far too busy making their own music to find the time to do so.
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#9
Quote by steven seagull
The only time I can understand somebody stopping consciously making the effort to learn songs is when they get to the point where they can pretty much figure anything out by ear on the spot, or if they're far too busy making their own music to find the time to do so.


Or if they don't feel like learning entire songs.

If I learn I song that I like I don't enjoy listening to it afterwards because it looses all of it's mystery.
#10
Understand that cranking your amp up to 10 and play your favorite song is sometimes the best thing to do. Period.
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#11
Try making your own songs.

Make sure to record yourself playing as much as you can, also. It helps.

And if you've run out of things to learn, just try to perfect the stuff you know. New stuff will come to you eventually.
#12
Quote by steven seagull
If you've run out of songs to learn then put bluntly you shouldn't really be playing the guitar. You should be playing the guitar because you love music and more importantly love the instrument, not because of a couple of bands or one genre. If you're not prepared to widen your own musical horizons in order to help your development then there's no point posting here asking for help. The fact that you have a desire to play that instrument should be all the reason you need for going out and finding new stuff to listen to.

I've been playing 18 years and from the moment I first picked the thing up I've never been short of something to learn - the problem is there's too much stuff I want to be able to play and I doubt I'll ever learn it all.

what i mean is that i want to learn other stuff so i can just become a better overall player....like some other genres because right now all is play is rock and i want to learn other stuff to increase my ability to write instrumentals and stuff...
Squirrels>all other animals group

Quote by Prophet of Page
I don't recommend passive pickups for any kind of blues tone. Ideally, you'd want a passive pickup with a reasonably low level of output.
#13
It sounds like a bad place to be, where you "stop wanting to learn songs" that is. There's no song out there that won't improve your ability. There's no need to be arrogant about it, thinking a song is "beneath" you or whatever; learning anything is still learning.

Expanding your genres is a very good thing however. Try something radically different. I bet you've never done any slide or any fingerstyle. There are so many different approaches to the guitar that it's hard to run out of ideas. Try to learn something new every day.
#14
Quote by eahilder
when you stop wanting to learn songs and/or there are none you want to learn and you just want to learn alot of defferent techniques...



Hopefully never

learning new techniques is a good idea. Abandoning the idea of playing music on your musical instrument does not make much sense to me.

You seem to think that learning songs is at 1 "level", and then learning techniques is at another.... and you seem to think that learning techniques is a higher "level". It doesn't work that way. it all goes together. Don't drop music for technique. Work on music, and if a particular technique is needed..... work on it..... so that you can play the music.
#15
Quote by eahilder
what i mean is that i want to learn other stuff so i can just become a better overall player....like some other genres because right now all is play is rock and i want to learn other stuff to increase my ability to write instrumentals and stuff...

What else is there? It's a musical instrument, you play music on it. If you're not doing that then what, exactly, are you doing with your guitar...cooking?

If you want to learn new techniques or theory that's fine, but the best way to practice new things and learn how to use them is to play them in context...ie learn a song that uses them.

and _+1 to bluesguy and munky, there are no "beginner" or "intermediate" songs really, just stuff you know and stuff you don't know, and everything you don't know is holding you back in some way.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jan 31, 2009,
#16
You'll reach that point when Gretchen goes to Nebraska.

Ignore everyone saying you shouldn't be playing the guitar if you don't want to learn the music of others right now. It is fine to work purely on technical ability for future learning and songwriting. Over the last year, I doubt I've learned 15 minutes of music written by others, but I've written 100ish minutes of original music; it's all on do on the guitar these days.

As for learning music theory, I like the lesson in my sig. It looks like a massive wall of text at first, but most of the page is comments, so it's shorter than you think, and if you work through it methodically and ask specific questions when you get confused ("I don't get it" doesn't help us help you), you'll learn that material well enough to teach it.

As far as techniques, I suggest practicing the following speed techniques:
1. ALTERNATE PICKING (You must be good at this; it is the most important part of fast playing.)
2. Economy picking (and deciding when alternate picking is appropriate and when economy is better)
3. String Skipping
4. Sweep Picking
5. Trills
6. Tapping
7. Multi-finger tapping
8. Sweep Tapping
9. Combining all of the above when you need to
#17
Try become proficient in a variety of genres, such as jazz, rock, metal, classical, etc.
Each genre has its own technicalities, such as the insane chords in jazz, the finger-picking in classical, and the like.
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#18
Quote by steven seagull
What else is there? It's a musical instrument, you play music on it. If you're not doing that then what, exactly, are you doing with your guitar...cooking?


Well, not everyone has the same reasons. If it were ONLY about the music, I'm not sure I'd be playing. For me it's more about reaching a state of mind, figuring out what mastery is all about, learning more about myself, and creating. Those are a lot more important to me than simply the music. The music is a nice end result, but I actually find the most personal value in the process. And "making music" is not necessarily equivalent to "learning songs"...

Still, there's no shortage of songs to learn. I haven't actually sat down and learned one in a long time (probably "Yesterdays" in my profile is the last song I really worked on at that was like 2-3years ago and I've pretty much forgotten it now). Learning any song is definitely time well spent, I've just been too busy working on any number of other things.