#1
Hotel California's opening progression includes both an Emaj and Emin chord in the same progression; how/when do you use both maj and min chords of the same root note? Does the song change keys when this happens?
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#2
when it sounds good. Everything in theory does not need an explanation.
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#3
Listen to Norweigian Wood by The Beatles. It has a D to Dmin progression in it.
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#4
Quote by Led man32
when it sounds good. Everything in theory does not need an explanation.

Theory IS an explanation, baka.

I wanna know this answer too, I have a D major chord in a Dm key, and I don't know if it's modulation or something.
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Last edited by SilverDark at Jan 30, 2009,
#5
Quote by McGelie
Listen to Norweigian Wood by The Beatles. It has a D to Dmin progression in it.

actually a very large number of beatles songs do this.
#7
Could it be an accidental? That would be the simplest explanation.
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#8
its a subitution from the parallel majar or minor..

more than likely its not a modulation (i would say never.. but it could happen)

Edit: What other chords are there?
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Jan 30, 2009,
#9
There are quite a few songs that do this. Another Eagles song, Lyin' Eyes, does the same thing in the chorus. I wouldn't say it's a key change, it's just a part of the progression that sounds good. While we're on the topic of Eagles, New Kid In Town does do a key change in the third verse. The song starts off in the key of E, then goes to the key of G.
#10
The E major follows an A minor chord. This borows a G# note from A harmonic minor, in order to create a sort of descending chromatic idea. Bm - F#/A# - Am - E/G# - G - D/F#

The E minor is there because it's in key with Bm, the key of the song.

It's all there in the interest of sounding nice.
#11
Bm, F#, A, E, G, D, Em, F#

The song is actually another non-diatonic chord in it. The F# isn't in the key, but it sounds good. Also the E.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jan 30, 2009,
#12
I would say they're using the technique of borrowing from the parallel minor key. the song is in B minor, and the parallel major key would of course be B major in this case they using the parallel major to replace the 4th and 5th chords... IV and V instead of iv and v.

and of course, they do this because it simply sounds good. there is not much of a formula for knowing exactly when borrowing from the parallel key will work. it depends on the song. check out "I'm Your Captain" by Grand Funk Railroad for a great example... the song is in D major for the most part, but the bridge is in D minor.
#14
Quote by victoryaloy
its a subitution from the parallel majar or minor..


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