#1
got any techniques for reading music scores? and in memorizing the tones on every string and fret of the guitar??
#2
Not really. There's no technique to it, you just have to dedicate the time and effort to do so, same as reading words and letters.
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#3
I suggest just sight reading as much as possible. Go to your local music shop and buy a easy classical guitar book and just sight read through them all, then once you have done that go back and learn the pieces properly.
#4
Quote by domenic_665
got any techniques for reading music scores? and in memorizing the tones on every string and fret of the guitar??
Get familar with the musical staff.

Learn some major scale patterns. Suprisingly usefull, especially if you know the song is in X major scale and no accidentals are used, you can just stick to X major shape.

Know the notes of the first five frets hard. It's best to know more, but that's a start.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#5
Reading music is like reading text.

With text, you first start by sounding out simple words... "c...a....t......CAT!" Once you've seen that word a bunch of times, you just look at it and know what it is. You start to recognize various letter combinations and know what they are and be able to string them together. So, even if you've never seen the word 'altruistic' before, you can still get there without much effort because you can break it down.

You just have to go into it realizing that it takes time, and that it requires a lot of repetition and practice. Don't expect miracles in two weeks. You didn't read A Tale of Two Cities in grade one, now, did you?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jan 31, 2009,
#6
Quote by axemanchris
Reading music is like reading text.

I think its quite different, the two. While reading text is the reading of the letters, in music you have to read the note and the rhythm value of it. I have a theory that sight-reading is dependent on how well you can read the rhythm and how fast you can relate the note on your instrument.

That said, I believe getting the book "Modern Reading in 4/4" and running through it a couple of four or five times can help you get a better grasp at reading rhythms. All you need to do next is to read the note and apply it on the guitar.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#7
But when reading text, you read a little bit ahead of where you're actually at so as to know what words are coming. This helps you to both understand the words in the context that they are used, and to allow you to use appropriate expression when reading aloud.

In music, you'll be looking ahead for similar reasons - to get a sense of what context the notes are appearing so as to adjust for the most appropriate hand positions, and to capture the contextual rhythmic patterns associated with the notes.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Treble stave: On the lines from bottom up: Every Good Boy Drinks Fanta (the firt letter is the note)

Treble Stave: In between the lines from bottom up: F A C E

Bass Stave: On the lines from bottom up: Gay Boys Die From Aids (made it up myself)

Bass Stave: In between the lines from bottom up: A C E G (don't have one for that, you do it)
#9
^ I prefer the more conventional "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour" and "Good Boys Deserve Favour Always". It's got more of a logical ring to it.

For the others, I remember FACE, as in "your Face, lol", and (and this is actually something my father taught me) "ACE-G" as in "ACE; what you find in a pack of playing cards, G, as in the letter G". I don't know why he thought that would stick in my mind, but for some reason it did. That's what a firm hand ready to slap you will do to you.
#10
Quote by anotherbluesguy
^ I prefer the more conventional "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour" and "Good Boys Deserve Favour Always". It's got more of a logical ring to it.

For the others, I remember FACE, as in "your Face, lol", and (and this is actually something my father taught me) "ACE-G" as in "ACE; what you find in a pack of playing cards, G, as in the letter G". I don't know why he thought that would stick in my mind, but for some reason it did. That's what a firm hand ready to slap you will do to you.

FACE and ACEG were the only ones I ever bothered to remember. I remembered ACEG because it sounds like a cool name for some anime character.

Quote by axemanchris
But when reading text, you read a little bit ahead of where you're actually at so as to know what words are coming. This helps you to both understand the words in the context that they are used, and to allow you to use appropriate expression when reading aloud.

In music, you'll be looking ahead for similar reasons - to get a sense of what context the notes are appearing so as to adjust for the most appropriate hand positions, and to capture the contextual rhythmic patterns associated with the notes.

CT

So it's all down to practice...
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
Last edited by SilverDark at Jan 31, 2009,
#11
A couple of tricks I use with kids are:

Treble:
Ernie Gave Bert Dog Food
FACE rhymes with space

Bass: (both animals, so easy to remember)
Grizzly Bears Don't Fear Ants
All Cows Eat Grass

The kids like 'em....

CT

PS. ... and yes, it is all about practice...
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by axemanchris

Bass: (both animals, so easy to remember)
Grizzly Bears Don't Fear Ants


Haha I have an animal based Bass clef too ;]

Bass:
Great Big Dogs Fight Animals
I just remember it's a Am7 chord xD (ACEG)

My treble:
Every Good Boy Deserves Favors
FACE as... in a face xD
#13
Type a random word into the "Guitar Tabs" search function on this site.
Pick a random tab, one of which you have not heard of before.

Play it through, sight-reading. Be sure to take timing into account.
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#14
Quote by Iriathz
Type a random word into the "Guitar Tabs" search function on this site.
Pick a random tab, one of which you have not heard of before.

Play it through, sight-reading. Be sure to take timing into account.



You can't sight-read tabs... Unless the tabber specified a specific rhythm, you need to hear the song in order to know the rhythm.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#15
Quote by SilverDark


I'll say....

Quote by SilverDark

You can't sight-read tabs... Unless the tabber specified a specific rhythm, you need to hear the song in order to know the rhythm.


Even at that, it's not really sight reading when you're only reading half of the required information. Seeing a 4 on the second string isn't going to help you one bit to learn that that note is Eb.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.