#1
Yamaha B100 III.Picked it up a week or two ago second hand.
I've been playing it into my cab with and ordinary cable.I meant to get get a speaker cable but someone told me because it's solidsate that an ordinary cable would work.
I was playin my guitar through it it would sorta,lose volume.I went to work and came home a few hours later same thing was wrong with it.
The speaker output jacks are loose but I have tried both many times.
I tried a different amp into the cab and it worked.
I have tried all the variables,different leads,no pedal,different instruments.
I have a feeling using the ordinary guitar cable has fried something.
So can anyone tell me what has happened to it?
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#2
my amp is solid state and i use a normal guitar cable as well, nothings happened to it and ive had it for months.
it could be something the owner before you did to it, thats a risk with secondhand gear man.
#3
No, you shouldn't use an instrument cable. Use a speaker cable.
Solid state and tube are ways of powering the amp.
Either way, it is still powered. This doesn't effect what type of cable you need.

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#4
Instrument cables are shielded and speaker ones are not. Therefore making your amp head fry. Turning on a tube head without a cab connection will also cause it to fry.
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#5
Well, seeing as it works with a different cab, and a different cable doesnt fix it, you've f**ked your cab.
#6
No the cab works with a different amp.
So what would I have fried in the head?
Please tell me it's just a fuse and not a transformer.
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#7
Whoops, didnt read that properly. Its prettymuch impossible for someone here to tell you whats gone wrong. It could be a number of things, and while some people here probably could find out what if the had access to the amp, they dont.
Take it to a tech.
#8
Quote by random_B-RAD
Instrument cables are shielded and speaker ones are not. Therefore making your amp head fry. Turning on a tube head without a cab connection will also cause it to fry.

You have no idea do you?
#9
Quote by al112987
You have no idea do you?

No, I'm trusting you people who told me exactly that 50 million times.
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#10
I don't see how anyone can deal with the sound of a head through an instrument cable. I don't know that it would ruin your head overtime or not. But it does seem like it would. Speaker cables are speaker cables for a reason.
#11
Quote by random_B-RAD
No, I'm trusting you people who told me exactly that 50 million times.


I have heard the same thing a lot of times. IT seems that it would. Never listen to anyone on here though. People here want to argue with ya no matter what.
#12
Just buy a new amp.
if an SS amp dies the repair will cost a lot, even if your amp is total crap (which is absolutely crap).
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#13
It might just be the fuse.

And A MILLION TIMES ON HERE people think their amp is tore up and it ends up being the multi outlet switch they got it plugged in, the wall power, an instrument cable not working.
#14
A speaker cable is made to carry the much higher electric load of speakers. The signal a guitar cable carries is miniscule by comparison. Its like trying to breath thru a drinking straw. At low volumes its not such an issue. But when you turn it up then the problems develop. Same straw analogy sitting in a chair watching tv its ok, but you wouldnt be able to run a marathon breathing thru a straw. So your amp has to work harder. If it was a fuse it wouldnt work. The volume surge is common issue with SS amps. Sometimes it can be something like a bad pot or a bad connection at the speaker outputs. But diagnosing and fixing a SS amp many times can cost just as much as buying a new one. Could be the reason it was at a pawn shop the last guy got rid of it before it got to bad or could be because you cranked it to much with a instrument cable.