#1
I have a clear understanding of what scales are: they're a collection of notes that specify the key of which you play in as well as the chords that can be developed off that key.

If I know the notes of every fret and corresponding string, why do I need to learn the scale positions and shapes of them? I see that is being kind of pointless. If I want to play in A minor, I can just play the notes that fall into the scale.
#2
That's right. If you know all the notes in the key and all the notes on the fretboard, then you don't need to learn the shapes. But I, for example, find it easier to see the notes as intervals in a web of patterns, rather than notes.
#3
+1 and once you realize that, and have a basic understanding of where the notes are on the fret board its very easy to find. Took me forever to figure that out though, don't know why.

And learning the notes everywhere on the neck is definitely a benefit and will help you a lot more than just learning patterns
#4
Quote by michal23
That's right. If you know all the notes in the key and all the notes on the fretboard, then you don't need to learn the shapes. But I, for example, find it easier to see the notes as intervals in a web of patterns, rather than notes.

So do you use the shapes but think "that's the sixth, that's the fourth"?

TS, imo opinion what you have done is a lot better than just learning the shapes because now you will be aware of what notes you are playing, instead of playing random notes from inside a shape.
#5
Quote by BohemianMusic
I have a clear understanding of what scales are: they're a collection of notes that specify the key of which you play in as well as the chords that can be developed off that key.

If I know the notes of every fret and corresponding string, why do I need to learn the scale positions and shapes of them? I see that is being kind of pointless. If I want to play in A minor, I can just play the notes that fall into the scale.


The patterns are a visual aid that not only help you find your way around the neck, but that also reinforce any theoretical concepts you may learn.

Do you "need" to learn them? Well no, not anymore than you "need" to learn anything. knowing them though, would certainly be a benefit.... not a detriment.


Learning what a scale is one thing. Being able to hear and visualize where those sounds are on the guitar neck is another. Ultimately, each perspective reinforces the other and makes your understanding that much deeper.


Quote by 12345abcd3

TS, imo opinion what you have done is a lot better than just learning the shapes because now you will be aware of what notes you are playing, instead of playing random notes from inside a shape.


knowing the notes is very useful, but you have to realize that people that don't know the notes are in no way restricted to "playing random notes from inside a shape", as you suggest. Thats a horrible misconception to be spreading.

Guitarists that most people would consider good (that play by ear/shapes) are in control of what they play and choose notes deliberately, based on how they sound .......not randomly.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 31, 2009,