#1
compared to keyboard the notes in guitar chords commonly jump from 1 5 3 or 5 1 3 etc due to the direction you strum them. Would this be considered an invertion (for example an Open D chord on 5 strings?
Last edited by DegaMeth at Jan 31, 2009,
#2
Im pretty sure it doesnt, as the, say, root is still in the bass. get it? now if the 5th were the note in the bass, then I think it'd be considered an inversion
#3
No.

An inversion is where a note other than the root note (the defining note of the chord, the C in Cmajor) is used as the bass note (the lowest note of the chord).

So if I played an E minor chord, but put my pinky on the third on the heavy E string (G note) this would be an inversion.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#4
Quote by demonofthenight
An inversion is where a note other than the root note is used as the bass note.

^This is exactly what an inverted chord is.

Looking at your post TS you give an example of playing an open D chord on 5 strings. If you mean like this...

 |---|-X-|---|---|
 |---|---|-X-|---|
 |---|-X-|---|---|
O|---|---|---|---|
O|---|---|---|---|
X|---|---|---|---|

That would be an open D chord with the open A string also being played. Yes that is a 2nd inversion of a D major chord. It is written D/A. That is "chord" / "bass note".

A root position is a chord with the root note as the lowest note in the chord.
A first inversion is a chord with the third as the lowest note.
A second inversion is a chord with the fifth as the lowest note.
Si