#1
Hey ppl is it ok to apply olive oil on the fretboard occasionally from time to time?? Any other oil u use for your fretboard pls do mention and how to apply it whats ur method and stuff..
Thx
@titude
#4
i dont know about you but on my guitars, the sweat from my hands greases them up pretty well..
but cleaning is something to be concerned about...
#5
no its not about greasing it for speed or something i have heard its good for the wood and maybe improves the tonal qualities too
#6
I use lemon oil on mine, you can pick up fretboard cleaning kits (fret polishing stuff, fretboard oil etc.) at most guitar shops. Ask next time you go in and they should be able to point you in the right direction
#7
Quote by firesprite
I use lemon oil on mine, you can pick up fretboard cleaning kits (fret polishing stuff, fretboard oil etc.) at most guitar shops. Ask next time you go in and they should be able to point you in the right direction


Hey Thx buddy i'll check out my local store for it
#8
http://www.muzique.com/schem/fret.htm

A Small extract

A statement that is seen many times in the newsgroups is "use only 100% lemon oil". First, there are NO furniture care products that actually contain nothing but lemon oil, and even if there were, you would not want to use it on a wood finish. Pure cold-pressed lemon oil is very expensive and could not be marketed for $3 or $4 per bottle like the furniture oils you see in stores.

"But Product XYZ says that it contains 100% lemon oil." Yes, I've seen products with that on the label, and I assure you it is a false and misleading statement. It is used in the context that the product contains 100% lemon oil conditioner as opposed to a cheaper steam-distilled citrus oil or synthetic duplicate made from pine tree wood. Typically 99% or more of the product is a mineral oil with less than 1% lemon oil.

Pure lemon oil (or other citrus oils) is composed of d-limonene at an amount of 90% or more. There are other minor components that give each of the citrus oils its own unique flavors and fragrances. These ingredients include citral, linalool, geraniol, nerol, citronella, pinenes and other terpenes.

Since d-limonene is the majority of lemon oil (or orange oil), we can look at its properties to determine why it is not suited for fretboard care. First, and most importantly, d-limonene is a very strong solvent. It is used to remove glue, paint, grease, oil and other substances. If an oil with a high percentage of d-limonene were applied to a fretboard, it might even begin to loosen the bindings, fret markers or other trim. Additionally, it could soften some varnishes or lacquers used on necks and bodies. Also the vapors of d-limonene are flammable with a flash point of about 124 degrees F.

Check out the article hope it helps all
#9
Olive oil is for salad dressing, not fretboards. Unless your fretboard is made from lollo rosso.
Actually called Mark!

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