#1
Well, i'm i guitarist whose been playing classical and acoustic for 4 years now. i've never played an electric and it was time i decided to get one. i'm getting an Epiphone Les Paul Standard in ebony..and i need to know what kind of amp i should get...i'd aim for all types of music so i'd need a diverse amp...one not too expensive i'm not rich. also, i want to know wat should i do when i get my guitar, anything to check, anything to look out for so that i know its perfect, and same goes for the amp..and wat do i do with the guitar once i get it, setting it up and playin and keepin it in the right way...i dunnoe how different is it from an acoustic, so pleasee! help this ug smilies are sooo cute lol.
#2
Well, electric is VERY different to acoustic.

Just check for general condition as a start, and how it's set up and the action and stuff. You don't want something that's harder than it needs to be to play.

It will feel strange for a while though, because it's a lot heavier and narrower.
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Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

#3
whats your budget?

seeing as your starting out, id recomend:

Peavet Vypyr Series

Vox Valvetronix Series

Roland Cube


try to stay away from Marshall MG series
#4
go to a music shop or place like Guitar Center....take your guitar with you and try out the amps....
#6
get a orange crush 15r the are cheap and sound good and look good too
gear :epiphone g400 custom
squier bullet strat
orange crush 15r
boss ds-2
fame ml-30
red hill CDG-3 SEQ

beaners gonna kick you in the face
#8
I'd say get a Marshall, you'd have little need for overdrive seeing as you'll be using a Les Paul but the classic setting would complement the guitar's sound well.
Gear;
- B.C. Rich Warbeast Bloodbound
- B.C. Rich NT Zombie 5-String Bass
- BOSS GT-10 Multi Effects TANK!
...In other words, I'm taking a giant dump on fender owners who use pods.
#9
what's your budget?

vox valvetronix are good for all styles of music.
with the guitar all you need to do is tune it and away you go, but it might be wise to check the intonation.
the majour difference is that the thickness has halved apart from that i can't think of anything.
the amp is just the same plug it in and get the settings that you want and off you go.
#10
Roland CUBE-15X Guitar Amp , Roland CUBE-30X Guitar Amp , Roland Micro Cube RX Guitar Amplifier , these are the ones i saw at a local music store, are they any good?
#11
^^^^^^^^^

Oh please, my line 6 pisses on your marshall.


decaying dave you maybe new here, but if u even mention the words Marshall and MG you'll be destroyed !


WITHOUTFAIL


check out the amps i recommended
#12
You didn't say how much you want to spend, but I'd look at the Roland MicroCube if you're really pressed for cash. For less than $200, you can get a decent little solid state amp. I play a $3000 tele through one a couple of weeks ago and it sounded darned good. I was a little shocked, actually. If you have $400, or so, to spend, try a Peavey Valveking 112. It's a nice tube amp with great sound out-of-the-box. Some folks like to upgrade the tubes and speaker, which is fine.
#13
when you get your guitar at the store make sure you really really really inspect that thing because, once it leave the store all it's imperfections are your problem not thiers. I can't stress that enough. the amp won't be nearly as enough of a problem though, just find one that really suits you. and remember you get what you pay for can't be true enough. I hope that helps
#14
I'd say get a Marshall, you'd have little need for overdrive seeing as you'll be using a Les Paul but the classic setting would complement the guitar's sound well.
wat'd u mean by the classic setting? tallica, ill check them out, but if they're too pricey or unavailable, whats a back up? and also, my budget would be around 0-250 us dollars. i hope ;S
#15
when you get your guitar at the store make sure you really really really inspect that thing because, once it leave the store all it's imperfections are your problem not thiers. I can't stress that enough. the amp won't be nearly as enough of a problem though, just find one that really suits you. and remember you get what you pay for can't be true enough. I hope that helps

i wouldnt know wat to look out for! other that everything in an acoustic....btws thanks for the help! and also, ill check out the peavy...how do i look out for effects in the amp?
#17
Quote by withoutfail
i wouldnt know wat to look out for! other that everything in an acoustic....btws thanks for the help! and also, ill check out the peavy...how do i look out for effects in the amp?

what you want to look for is any dings and dent in the paint along with chips in the paint. you'll almost have to get in an open area and really just get personal with the guitar, rotate it around until you've seen the whole instrument. if your not sure do this twice. the sit down and play it on a couple amps in your budget and pick the one you like.
#18
oh okay thanks, but what i meant by effects is the distortion, overdrive, whatever else effect i would need to play the genre i want? how do i look for those effects? do i definately need an effects pedal or would an amp come with some if not all?
#19
Quote by withoutfail
i wouldnt know wat to look out for! other that everything in an acoustic....btws thanks for the help! and also, ill check out the peavy...how do i look out for effects in the amp?



You've been playing for 4 years. You should know your guitars fairly well by now. You're basically looking for the same things in an electric.

Action: Action should be low, but not so low that you have fret buzz. Low action equates to faster playing. Fret buzz can be adjusted out by adjusting the saddles, or truss rod. Play all the frets to check for buzz.

Intonation: Check tuning on the open strings and at the 12th. It should be dead on. If not, make sure you have enough adjustment in the saddles to compensate and adjust for proper intonation.

Defects: Check the guitar for fit and finish problems. Ideally, no finish blemishes or scratches. If there are, these are great for negotiating the price down. A small scratch is worth at least $50 to $100. A ding or nick can be worth slightly more. All metal on the guitar should be shiny - no pitting or corrosion from excessive playing. Check for fret wear. A new guitar should have perfect frets - no wear. Check the fretboard for shiny marks in between the frets. These indicate the guitar has been played quite a bit. The fretboard should have a uniform appearance. Also look at the strings. Are they shiny, or are they dark and corroded? If corroded and you want to buy the guitar, request a string change.

Whammy: If the guitar has a whammy, does it stay in-tune after using it, or does it go sharp or flat? Cheap whammies will fail to stay in-tune. Good ones, such as those on PRS, Gibson, Fender and others will stay in-tune.

Play it!: Find an amp similar to the one you already have, or the exact one and play the guitar on it. This is the only way you can decide if you like the sound. Try the various pickup positions. How does the neck feel? One neck style may feel good to me, but may be nearly unplayable for you. Is the guitar too heavy? Epiphones weigh like a ton of bricks, while other types are fairly light and feel great. How do the frets complement your playing style? With all the different fret sizes, you may not like the ones on the guitar you're playing - they may be too high, or too small. Medium jumbo frets can be hard to play, since they sit so high off the fretboard. It takes a light touch to fret them, or else you can easily sharp the note you're playing.

Negotiate: Even if the guitar is in perfect condition, haggle with the salesman over price!!! At the very least, you should be able to get at least $100 off a $600 guitar. You should be able to get in the neighborhood of $200 to $300 off a $3000 guitar, if not more.

Hope this helps.
#21
Quote by KG6_Steven
You've been playing for 4 years. You should know your guitars fairly well by now. You're basically looking for the same things in an electric.

Action: Action should be low, but not so low that you have fret buzz. Low action equates to faster playing. Fret buzz can be adjusted out by adjusting the saddles, or truss rod. Play all the frets to check for buzz.

Intonation: Check tuning on the open strings and at the 12th. It should be dead on. If not, make sure you have enough adjustment in the saddles to compensate and adjust for proper intonation.

Defects: Check the guitar for fit and finish problems. Ideally, no finish blemishes or scratches. If there are, these are great for negotiating the price down. A small scratch is worth at least $50 to $100. A ding or nick can be worth slightly more. All metal on the guitar should be shiny - no pitting or corrosion from excessive playing. Check for fret wear. A new guitar should have perfect frets - no wear. Check the fretboard for shiny marks in between the frets. These indicate the guitar has been played quite a bit. The fretboard should have a uniform appearance. Also look at the strings. Are they shiny, or are they dark and corroded? If corroded and you want to buy the guitar, request a string change.

Whammy: If the guitar has a whammy, does it stay in-tune after using it, or does it go sharp or flat? Cheap whammies will fail to stay in-tune. Good ones, such as those on PRS, Gibson, Fender and others will stay in-tune.

Play it!: Find an amp similar to the one you already have, or the exact one and play the guitar on it. This is the only way you can decide if you like the sound. Try the various pickup positions. How does the neck feel? One neck style may feel good to me, but may be nearly unplayable for you. Is the guitar too heavy? Epiphones weigh like a ton of bricks, while other types are fairly light and feel great. How do the frets complement your playing style? With all the different fret sizes, you may not like the ones on the guitar you're playing - they may be too high, or too small. Medium jumbo frets can be hard to play, since they sit so high off the fretboard. It takes a light touch to fret them, or else you can easily sharp the note you're playing.

Negotiate: Even if the guitar is in perfect condition, haggle with the salesman over price!!! At the very least, you should be able to get at least $100 off a $600 guitar. You should be able to get in the neighborhood of $200 to $300 off a $3000 guitar, if not more.

Hope this helps.



OMG thanks so much. i pretty know what to look out for i guess. and it helps and lot.

You are worth me tipping my hat off, KG6_Steven
#22
i know that epiphones weigh a ton, i tried one b4 at a jam studio, it sounded great with their oversized amp whatever it is, the sound is good, the action was kinda low i guess.. i've tried the les paul studio, its medium jumbo, i think and its comfortable for me. but i don't know whats a whammy lol. i know it makes a different kind of sound with the guitar, i heard a muse song played with whammy if im not wrong, but wat is it and where is it and how do i use it?
#23
Quote by withoutfail
i know that epiphones weigh a ton, i tried one b4 at a jam studio, it sounded great with their oversized amp whatever it is, the sound is good, the action was kinda low i guess.. i've tried the les paul studio, its medium jumbo, i think and its comfortable for me. but i don't know whats a whammy lol. i know it makes a different kind of sound with the guitar, i heard a muse song played with whammy if im not wrong, but wat is it and where is it and how do i use it?


a whammy is often called a floyed rose or temelo arm and it is generally found on stratocasters and all you do is raise a bar up and down.
#24
Get a Peavey Vypyr 15 or 30 (If you can afford it).
Or a Vox VT- series.

DO NOT GET A LINE 6 SPIDER OR A MARSHALL MG, NO MATTER WHAT.
#25
I have to say ^ your explaintion of what to look for when getting a new guitar should go into an article. seriously.

edit: to kg6_ Steven
Last edited by -tempest- at Feb 1, 2009,
#26
yes bosses of the electric. ill heed ure advice. would a whammy be found on les pauls?
#27
No, some les pauls may have a whammy, but I think none of the standard models have it