#1
im getting a peavey 6505 and i can switch it between 4 8 and 16 ohms. im getting a vader 2x12 too, but i need to specify ohms when i order. what are the differences between the 4, 8 and 16 ohms? i was told that the ohm setting doesnt matter much for the sound quality but that i need to make sure the head and cab match. but surely there is SOMETHING that is different about the 3 settings. i need a good setting for metal.
#3
Quote by BeerChurch
Just make sure the cab and head match. I've never really noticed any difference in tone. The switch just gives flexability in what cabs you can connect.


Yup, I was just get a 16 ohm cab since you'll be able to use it with pretty much any amp under the sun beside a 4 ohm tube amp.
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#4
Quote by Kevin Saale
Yup, I was just get a 16 ohm cab since you'll be able to use it with pretty much any amp under the sun beside a 4 ohm tube amp.


So does that mean that 16 ohm is the most common on a head? And what are the safe mismatches in ohms anyway?

#5
You always want the head to have a speaker load when operating, so you want to run it at (at least) the minimum ohms, 4. You can have more ohms on the speakers than the head, but never less ohms on the speaker than the head. It's obviously best to match the speaker loads with the ohms on the head so that you can get the maximum power to the speakers and ensure that nothing screwy is happening to the tubes and stuff.

If you want to expand your rig, I would suggest the 16 ohm cabinet, if you never plan on buying another cabinet for that head ever again, might as well go with the 4 ohm. 8 ohm.
Last edited by Elvendar at Feb 1, 2009,
#6
Quote by SaintsofNowhere
So does that mean that 16 ohm is the most common on a head? And what are the safe mismatches in ohms anyway?



No, 8 probably is, but you can use an 8 ohm head with a 16 ohm cab, but not a 16 ohm head with an 8 ohm cab, that's why I say go with a 16 ohm cab.

^I don't see why he'd go with a 4 ohm cab even if he only used it for the peavey.
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#8
So if i have a 16 ohm cab, i can use it with a 4, 8, or 16 ohm head? also, what about full stacks? Say my head has two 8 ohm inputs to make a full stack. what could i use in each of those?

#9
I'm not sure if this applies to guitar amplifiers much, but theoretically..

4 ohm configuration will be louder than an 8 or 16.

The draw back of low impedance though, is that the lower the frequency the more energy it takes to create it. So occasionally, the really low impedance configuration can't deliver the energy to sustain the low frequency note so it either drops off to a very low volume or cuts out completely.


This is why, in the headphone world they offer various different versions of each set of headphones.
With a range of impedances. You should always go for the highest impedance that you can as long as you have the amplification to drive it to the volume you require.
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#10
Quote by SaintsofNowhere
So if i have a 16 ohm cab, i can use it with a 4, 8, or 16 ohm head? also, what about full stacks? Say my head has two 8 ohm inputs to make a full stack. what could i use in each of those?


Two 16 ohm cabs in a fullstack config would make an 8 ohm load (another reason to go for 16 ohms) You couldn't use a 4 ohm tube head with a 16 ohm cab, but you could use a 4 ohm SS head with a 16 ohm cab.
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