#1
I've been practicing ear training and have downloaded a program to help me with but I'm not getting it. Are there any good tips for practicing ear training? I've made no progress besides understanding what C and D sound like, and I knew that before I practiced that. I could practice for an hour, but then after stopping for a few minutes and trying again, I end up getting nothing it and messing up with anything but C and D.

Are there any tips or something? How does everyone get ear training so well?
#2
Mastering absolute pitch is hard. The purpose of ear training is to develop relative pitch, stuff like recognizing chords, intervals, scales, cadences, stuff like that. You can go to

www.musictheory.net (under trainers)
www.trainear.com
A program called GNU Solfege, if you don't want to go online all the time
Transcribe songs

and others and work out that ear. Trying to remember a definite pitch takes a lot of time. I can recognize an A note, but that's just tuning conditioning.
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Last edited by SilverDark at Feb 1, 2009,
#3
Do you need to master absolute pitch in order to develop intervals? I just started learning music theory but got discouraged about it starting with intervals, so I decided to train my ear instead before practicing intervals, but even that is hard.

I could remember what an E or an A sounds like based on hearing an open guitar string, or a G chord, that kind of stuff, but if I heard it in a song or even just a single note on a piano I might not get it.
#4
...wha?

absolute pitch is recognizing a note.

Relative pitch is recognizing... like, the spaces between notes (a chord, interval). Both related, but different concepts.

An interval is the space between two notes. Recognizing intervals, no, developing relative pitch will help you in the long run.

Besides, the theory behind them is much easier to learn than hearing them out. Maybe... a week to learn what they are, 3 months to learn how they sound? I'm thinkin more, perhaps, don't know.
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Last edited by SilverDark at Feb 1, 2009,
#5
Don't buy the david l. burge perfect pitch course. I'll sum it up here and now, at the risk of copyright infringement:

1. Play an F#. Hear how it makes a high pitched "whiiirr" sound, even on the bass strings?
2. Play an Eb. Hear how it makes a much duller tone, like a "huuumm", even on the treble strings?
3. Add a note. Make your own conclusion about how it sounds. Buy my relative pitch course.
4. When you get comfortable with those three, add another. Make your own conclusion on how it sounds. Check out my relative pitch course.
5. when you get comfortable with those four, add another. Make your own conclusion on how it sounds. In addition to perfect pitch, work on relative pitch. Buy my course.
6. I'm sure you see the pattern.

A dozen tapes to say that. It is by far and away the number one most worthless piece of crap instructional i have ever seen. Even advanced videos with some guy playing with no explanation is better.

It's even more worthless than the carlton sheets real estate course.

Besides, science is not exactly sure absolute pitch can be learned. Some argue its a talent you are born with or not.
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Last edited by millerdrr at Feb 1, 2009,
#6
^^ absolute pitch can be learned.

It's just like eyes, it's just that you use your eyes for 90% of the stuff in ur life. (Work, walking somewhere, recognising someone, doing overall stuff, road sings etc. etc. you get my point)


You aren't born with true sight either.

Take twins for example. If you see random twins somewhere, you can't distinguish them, but over time they aren't looking that similar, and you can spot em very well.

If you see them together and you see the difference, then it's relative, but if you see em individually, you can still recognise them. (Which would be "true/absolute" sight)

It's just that the part of the brain's that filters info through sight, takes over(becomes dominant), and the part of ur brain that filters info on sound gets neglected.

Same with someone talking.

If you hear someone talking in Chinese, every word sounds roughly the same (At least to my ears)

(take the stereotypical response of, yo dude talk Chinese;' hang sne wang ching chong') or something like that.

If you learn chinese however, you hear all the difference, and no word sound the same.


To summ it all up; I disagree with science. I think it's very much possible to learn to recognise true pitch.

The question here is, does everyone have the ability to open up the links in their brain to recognise true pitch. This is debatable.

So yes technically you could be born with true pitch, but this is misleading. Someone is just born with his mind links opened up to have the aural filter just as potentially open as the "Sight" filter.

Excuse me if some parts are hard to follow, my main language is Dutch not english, thank you.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,
#7
^fair point. But that particular course was completely worthless for me.

And your English is superb.
Bluegrass Rocks

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Quote by Basti95
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Rats, I thought someone would sig it and make me famous...

it was going to be my big break

#8
I do it by association - don't just learn songs, learn how they're constructed. Consciously look for intervals in all music, even stuff you don't play and make the extra effort to associate the sound with the name of the note, chord or interval

eg major 3rd, first two notes of the bassline in sweet child o mine; perfect 4th, first 4 bars of the Lemmings music...perfect 5th, next 4 bars of the Lemmings music
Actually called Mark!

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#9
Quote by steven seagull
I do it by association - don't just learn songs, learn how they're constructed. Consciously look for intervals in all music, even stuff you don't play and make the extra effort to associate the sound with the name of the note, chord or interval

eg major 3rd, first two notes of the bassline in sweet child o mine; perfect 4th, first 4 bars of the Lemmings music...perfect 5th, next 4 bars of the Lemmings music



My doorbell rings in an inverted major 3rd (, although I maybe gonna alter it and make it an inverted tritone, which basically would be ****ing awesome

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,
#10
"Hi, it's Darren...can you come round to my house please...no, no reason, I just need to brush up on my intervals."
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by steven seagull
"Hi, it's Darren...can you come round to my house please...no, no reason, I just need to brush up on my intervals."


lolol

or even better, play eruption tapping part on my doorbel (multiple tuned doorbells next to each other) and the door will open.

No need for keys, and it's like totally awesome

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
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[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,
#12
Congrats, you've just invented "Doorbell Hero"
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#13
Quote by SilverDark
...wha?

absolute pitch is recognizing a note.

Relative pitch is recognizing... like, the spaces between notes (a chord, interval). Both related, but different concepts.

An interval is the space between two notes. Recognizing intervals, no, developing relative pitch will help you in the long run.

Besides, the theory behind them is much easier to learn than hearing them out. Maybe... a week to learn what they are, 3 months to learn how they sound? I'm thinkin more, perhaps, don't know.

Oops, I had some terminology mess-up... what I meant was, do you need to master absolute pitch in order to master relative pitch, along with intervals/chords, etc...

I already plan to practice intervals, but want to after I practice enough ear training.
#14
Quote by Shoj_
Oops, I had some terminology mess-up... what I meant was, do you need to master absolute pitch in order to master relative pitch, along with intervals/chords, etc...

I already plan to practice intervals, but want to after I practice enough ear training.

No, not at all. Most people can't sing a G note, but they can definitely improvise like a mutha. It would help knowing what notes are played, but any musician can succeed with relative pitch.

And please, learn intervals NOW. They're the blocks of music. Without them, there wouldn't be that pleasant feeling after a harsh tone. Intervals are the first thing you'd go up against for ear training.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#15
I've tried the Burge Perfect Pitch course too - and I agree that it was a whole lot of time talking about nothing....and encouraging you to relax if you feel like you're learning nothing.

I didn't waste money on it though...I checked it out from the library thankfully
#16
Quote by sixtwofive
I've tried the Burge Perfect Pitch course too - and I agree that it was a whole lot of time talking about nothing....and encouraging you to relax if you feel like you're learning nothing.

I didn't waste money on it though...I checked it out from the library thankfully

Waste of time indeed, though I got my copy through a small embargo...

y'know... Arr, matey?
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#17
Quote by xxdarrenxx

Same with someone talking.

If you hear someone talking in Chinese, every word sounds roughly the same (At least to my ears)

(take the stereotypical response of, yo dude talk Chinese;' hang sne wang ching chong') or something like that.

If you learn chinese however, you hear all the difference, and no word sound the same.



Curious you should mention Chinese languages for this - most (if not all, I'm no expert) of their dialects use pitch as an indicator of meaning, and work that I've read on absolute pitch seems to favour this as an explanation for the higher incidence of absolute pitch in the native speakers of those languages.
#18
I developed my ear through transcribing simple punk songs. I still cant go "Ahh that’s a Bb" when I hear a chord., But give me a guitar and I can transcribe what I’m hearing without really thinking about it.

Transcribing punk or any other simple forms of music, is the best method in my opinion.