#1
After awhile i was trying to make a good riff NOTHING came then finnaly before going to sleep bam! i played something good and added bit more to it and just dunno what to add after that...

HOW DO YOU KNOW what to add?!? do i just keep playing around till something good comes out again that blends with it?!?!

And i know NO music theory.Just know how to harmonize..


Any tips on what to add next!??! what would you do maybe!?
Last edited by wasanga at Feb 1, 2009,
#2
depends on what you think you will hear. its mostly your own opinion. hum it in your head and let yourself ramble on afterwards.

and as for theory, click the link in my sig if youre interested. although not much will help you immediately for your current situation.
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#4
thanks guys but if anyone else reads this please say what you thinkg or would do?
#5
Quote by Ryzeke1
Borrow from other artists. And then add a drum track.

Most ppl wouldn't agree with that advice but it can actually help you a bit. If you can hear what you want in your head you might realize that there's a song you know that sounds similar to it. Go and check it out and borrow little things that make it like that. Could be a chord progression or a particular technique.

Apart from that, just play random stuff... go along with whatever comes. Most important though, don't push yourself too hard. There's no way that you can force yourself into creating a great piece in one sitting, sometimes not even in a single week or so.

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#6
Thanks again ..if anyone else has any more tips!!! please post them here!!! ill keep checking
#7
Quote by wasanga
After awhile i was trying to make a good riff NOTHING came then finnaly before going to sleep bam!


Your answer is in your question. When you're trying, it's your ego. The ego is fairly pathetic and can't create worth a damn. When you got out of your own way, you let what was actually inside you come out. So, do more of that. Get out of the way.

It can't hurt to learn the theory either. It will ultimately help more of it come out and help identify what it is that's coming out.
#9
I think this question is an open one. Really it depends on the person. Some people would prefer to use theory, whereas other will just play and something good comes. With riffs, my personal thing is I play around a tonal, do whatever I feel like doing and something eventually will come that sounds great. Once I have this down, i then figure out what scale, and what would sound good coming off of that etc...

Really it's just personal opinion. Try everyway possible and see what you like best.
#10
Quote by scottydoode
I think this question is an open one. Really it depends on the person. Some people would prefer to use theory, whereas other will just play and something good comes. With riffs, my personal thing is I play around a tonal, do whatever I feel like doing and something eventually will come that sounds great. Once I have this down, i then figure out what scale, and what would sound good coming off of that etc...

Really it's just personal opinion. Try everyway possible and see what you like best.


thank you :O!!!
#11
What I would do is write a singing melody that fits using some simple counterpoint (proper counterpoint is boring and difficult), figure out a drum riff, maybe have a guitar strum some chords which are being implied by the melody/riff, maybe write some more voices to make complete chords, maybe have a third individual riff played by a bass. Depends on what I feel like writing.

My advice is this: learn theory (the more the better), analyse some songs, learn classical melody writing, learn counterpoint.
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#12
generally its better to stick with 3-4 main riffs in a song(if you add more listeners will forget the first ones and wont remember the song as a whole) the forms of verses, choruses and interludes etc, then to prevent it from becoming repetitive, add variations of the riffs with them played with different instruments or with slightly different rhythm.

Porcupine Tree is a good example of how simple songs, when well mastered in this fashion, can sound incredible