#1
Ok a lot of people may have seen this thread before but I'm kind of obsessed with getting a good practice regime as often as I can?

How long say a brilliant guitarist (ie page) , when starting out/ becoming intermediate spend doing warm up exercises, then how long would he spend on actual songs...I spend a good deal of time on warm up exercises, scales, chord changes, hammer ons...then some time on songs...

How many hours a day would someone like Page have practiced? Does anyone know a decent site that may have a good time table...I'm going to get military with my practice


I'm pretty sure they didn't have the intent then :P so I guess most of it was done from ear or books?
#3
Page worked as a session guitarist for years before The Yardbirds or Led Zep. With that in mind, he probably had a whole lot of practice through experience before being called legendary.
#4
Page probably didn't practiced long.

His guitar playing isn't very great, his music is.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#5
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Page probably didn't practiced long.

His guitar playing isn't very great, his music is.


True! But stil a great guitarplayer.
#7
Quote by maoven
True! But stil a great guitarplayer.


That's not gonna help TS.

His technique can be learned quite fast. It's the notes he chooses in his licks and solo's, but this is basically song writing (solowriting), and no matter how long you practice, this comes from creativity and/or musical experiences and not guitar technique.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,
#8
...2 hours a day? seriously these other guys weren't giving you a specific time. I am.
#10
Quote by HIM%(^
64 hours a day..
while eating swedish pizza


he time warped!

but yes his musical theory knowledge is what made him genius, not his ability

learn in depth musical theory, and just feel the instrument when your playing, it shouldnt be laborious, you should feeeeeeeeeeeeellllll the playing
#11
Quote by marko'd
...2 hours a day? seriously these other guys weren't giving you a specific time. I am.


Because his question is vague. Saying 2 hours doesn't help at all. If you practice 1 greenday song for 10 hours, and I practice 2 greenday songs in 10 hours, then we both practiced for the same ammount of time, only I can play 1 song more then you.

Giving random times is ridiculous. It depends how intense you practice, and how fast you pick things up.

He believes That page wrote what he wrote, because he had awesome guitar skills. I pointed out, that it's because of his musical experience and creativity, and practising all day long will just increase technique.

It's not that he did sweeps or string skipping or anything like that.

I'm not Bashing on Page or TS, but he misunderstands what made Page who he is.

To TS;


Just play ur guitar and write songs. Write song everyday.

If you feel ur stuck, learn theory, maybe it can help you in finding new creativity.

If that doesn't help check out other artists you like, to see what they did, and try to find which chord, note, riff makes you feel the way it makes you feel.

The first 1000 songs maybe sound like crap, but it doesn't matter. You will get better and better at it, and there will come a time ur satisfied with ur own songs. You just keep at it.

You must finish ur songs though, crap or no crap. You need to make mistakes to know what not to do, then when you get better at songwriting, you will make less and less mistakes, until you write good and nice songs.

With mistakes I also mean things you "shouldn't play".

It's not in what you play, but in the notes that you don't play. And this will only come through experience (maybe years of it, maybe less, that's totally different for everyone)

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,
#12
Quote by maoven
True! But stil a great guitarplayer.

Nah, i'd call him a great musician, not guitar player.

On topic though: If you want to improve your technique then 1-2 hours a day doing exercises that relate to whatever it is you want to improve in. Creativity, musicianship, and creating your own sound only comes after time.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
Last edited by evening_crow at Feb 2, 2009,
#13
does anyone know

if page was actually schooled on theory or did he teach himself?
or did he just pick stuff up in the studios when he was younger?
#14
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Page probably didn't practiced long.

His guitar playing isn't very great, his music is.



Ok that's cool I've heard it before could someone explain to me...how was he not that good technically?

When I listen to his soloing and to Black Mountain Side, or the beginning of Bron-Yr-Stomp and loads others, I just think holy ****!


Who is good technically...Steve Vai? I agree that perfect technique doesn't equate to great music...of course...but you'll have to forgive me if I can't spot why one great musician isn't technically brilliant...it's going to take some time
#15
Quote by Tkm
Ok that's cool I've heard it before could someone explain to me...how was he not that good technically?

When I listen to his soloing and to Black Mountain Side, or the beginning of Bron-Yr-Stomp and loads others, I just think holy ****!


Who is good technically...Steve Vai? I agree that perfect technique doesn't equate to great music...of course...but you'll have to forgive me if I can't spot why one great musician isn't technically brilliant...it's going to take some time

Ah... honestly, i think Paige was rather sloppy in his playing but he was a good MUSICIAN. If you want examples of ppl that great musicians but not very proficient in technique look at Kurt Cobain, Billy Corgan, Matthew Bellamy (he does know a lot of theory but his guitar playing isn't necessarily that hard to be honest).
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#16
Quote by evening_crow
Ah... honestly, i think Paige was rather sloppy in his playing but he was a good MUSICIAN. If you want examples of ppl that great musicians but not very proficient in technique look at Kurt Cobain, Billy Corgan, Matthew Bellamy (he does know a lot of theory but his guitar playing isn't necessarily that hard to be honest).



mmm...ok yeah. What about Slash?
#17
Quote by Tkm
mmm...ok yeah. What about Slash?


Slash has quite good technique and good timing, he's just not versatile.

People think good technique is if you can do sweeping tapping etc. this is not true.

Good technique means the things you play on ur guitar, you can play them dynamically and with good timing, and good timbre.

knowing alot of techniques just means ur versatile, doesn't necessarily mean good technique.

I teach my own students to get the best out of what they can do already. Especially dynamics seems problematic to most players.

I rather see someone play a standard blues solo with spot on bends and nice vibrato and good dynamics and timing, then someone playing sweeps with fret noise and slop and a poor vibrato.

Likewise, I rather see someone play nice flawless sweeps and taps then someone trying to make a blues solo with poor vibrato and bends that sound like he's dying.

That being said; I totally admire Petrucci, Vai, Satch etc. for what they have explored on the guitar, and even greater respect for Satch who stood up and revolutionised much of instrumental rock as a "True" genre.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 2, 2009,
#18
The amount of time that Jimmy Page or Steve Vai or Frank Zappa or Angus Young or Francesco Fareri or Michael Angelo Batio or Albert King practiced is not going to help you.

You are not Jimmy Page or Steve Vai or Frank Zappa or Angus Young or Francesco Fareri or Michael Angelo Batio or Albert King. You are you, and you need to practice the amount of time that you need.

Edit -
Quote by Tkm
Ok that's cool I've heard it before could someone explain to me...how was he not that good technically?

When I listen to his soloing and to Black Mountain Side, or the beginning of Bron-Yr-Stomp and loads others, I just think holy ****!


Who is good technically...Steve Vai? I agree that perfect technique doesn't equate to great music...of course...but you'll have to forgive me if I can't spot why one great musician isn't technically brilliant...it's going to take some time


Have you ever listened to the Heartbreaker solo?

That has got to be the single sloppiest professional solo I've ever heard.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Feb 2, 2009,
#19
I have to say though, Tony Iommi, Ritchie Blackmoore and Page all have many sloppy solos on their albums.
It's kinda their "tone" I guess.
#21
He used a lot of cocaine in his youth, so he probably did 10 hours a day in about 35 minutes
#22
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Because his question is vague. Saying 2 hours doesn't help at all. If you practice 1 greenday song for 10 hours, and I practice 2 greenday songs in 10 hours, then we both practiced for the same ammount of time, only I can play 1 song more then you.

Giving random times is ridiculous. It depends how intense you practice, and how fast you pick things up.

He believes That page wrote what he wrote, because he had awesome guitar skills. I pointed out, that it's because of his musical experience and creativity, and practising all day long will just increase technique.

It's not that he did sweeps or string skipping or anything like that.

I'm not Bashing on Page or TS, but he misunderstands what made Page who he is.

To TS;


Just play ur guitar and write songs. Write song everyday.

If you feel ur stuck, learn theory, maybe it can help you in finding new creativity.

If that doesn't help check out other artists you like, to see what they did, and try to find which chord, note, riff makes you feel the way it makes you feel.

The first 1000 songs maybe sound like crap, but it doesn't matter. You will get better and better at it, and there will come a time ur satisfied with ur own songs. You just keep at it.

You must finish ur songs though, crap or no crap. You need to make mistakes to know what not to do, then when you get better at songwriting, you will make less and less mistakes, until you write good and nice songs.

With mistakes I also mean things you "shouldn't play".

It's not in what you play, but in the notes that you don't play. And this will only come through experience (maybe years of it, maybe less, that's totally different for everyone)


Great post on the songwriting part.
By the way, I'm sorry I can't help you but anyway you shouldn't try to play as long or as short as others do, you should treat practice as something fun, so you can do it for as long as you can.
“The guy said NBA players are one in a million, ... I said, 'Man, look, I'm going to be that one in a million.'”
Kobe Bryant
#23
IIRC

In his prime, Slash practiced up to 12 hours a day.

Not sure about Page, though.

IMO, being a good musician is "feeling" the music when you play it. I don't really know how to explain that, but I think you know what I mean.

Though Buckethead is a good guitarist, he plays standing straight up stiff as a board without any emotion. When he plays, it seems like he is trying to impress (or distract) the crowd with his fast playing, rather than allow them to "feel" the music like Slash, Gary Moore, Clapton, and many others tend to do.
Last edited by Scopic at Feb 3, 2009,
#24
I would assume only Jimmy Page could answer this question. however, I would have to agree with xxdarrenxx, Jimmy Page isn't a very polished player. He's considered one of the greatest guitar players of all time, but I would speculate that it is more for his creative efforts, style, influence on other guitar players, etc. and not being a technically proficient player.

I'd have to say the same thing about B.B. King (also considered a guitar great). It doesn't take a whole lot of skill to do what he does as far as playing, but he has his own style, finesse, and has had a lot of influence on other players.

Some consider Kurt Cobain a great guitar player... I don't see that, but he definitely had a huge influence in the music world (whether you like him or hate him).

Getting back to your real question... I don't think you can go out and find a time table for practicing guitar that's going to lead to specific results for everyone. One person may simply be more technically proficient over another player regardless of the number of hours spent practicing. You can only achieve what you are determined to achieve, and even then you may not get there in the time frame you envisioned from the beginning.
#25
Page probably practiced 48 hours a day.
Point is, he practiced a lot. Your practice time should be up to yourself. I find it best to start out with 20 minutes of warm up (I usually do some figures off Vai's workout thing), then 30 min to an hour of learning/practicing new techniques (This can be picking, tapping, anything), during those 30 to 60 minutes also work on learning new songs. I find it best to jam for a bit after.
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#26
Quote by Scopic
IIRC

In his prime, Slash practiced up to 12 hours a day.

Not sure about Page, though.

IMO, being a good musician is "feeling" the music when you play it. I don't really know how to explain that, but I think you know what I mean.

Though Buckethead is a good guitarist, he plays standing straight up stiff as a board without any emotion. When he plays, it seems like he is trying to impress (or distract) the crowd with his fast playing, rather than allow them to "feel" the music like Slash, Gary Moore, Clapton, and many others tend to do.


First off, that Buckethead thing was totally random and off topic. Secondly, Buckethead is an amazingly "emotional" guitarist if you actually dig into the meat of his music. Listen to something off of the album Colma or something like "Nottingham Lace" and tell me that it's stiff and without feel.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#27
Quote by lefthandman9876
he time warped!

but yes his musical theory knowledge is what made him genius, not his ability

learn in depth musical theory, and just feel the instrument when your playing, it shouldnt be laborious, you should feeeeeeeeeeeeellllll the playing


#28
How to be Jimmy Page;

Do a lot of a string-bending and have all your fans call it feeling.
Play sloppy (read: don't practice that often)
#29
Quote by Sopheydood
How to be Jimmy Page;

Do a lot of a string-bending and have all your fans call it feeling.
Play sloppy (read: don't practice that often)



Can I insult this man without being banned?
#30
Quote by Jadena
Can I insult this man without being banned?


Naw, Ill do it.
Hes a troll
#31
Quote by Scopic
IIRC
Though Buckethead is a good guitarist, he plays standing straight up stiff as a board without any emotion. When he plays, it seems like he is trying to impress (or distract) the crowd with his fast playing, rather than allow them to "feel" the music like Slash, Gary Moore, Clapton, and many others tend to do.

Because I feel like it, I'm going to prove you wrong.
How on earth does Buckethead distract the audience when he's playing stiff as a board? Which he isn't. If you notice, he's always swaying to the beat, which to me is a lot more emotion that making gruesome facing and jumping around wildly, which to me shows distraction of the music, which is what you were just saying Buckethead does.
Also, Buckethead's music has more emotion than that of anyone elses I've heard of. His songs like 'For Mom' 'Watching the Boats With my Dad' and 'Spell of the Gypsies' have more emotion than anything I've heard, and its quite overwhelming. Don't rant on Buckethead because it appears that all you've listened to of his is 'Jordan' and you didn't like the song.
[/pwnt]
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me